Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Displaying 1 - 10 of 29

Wildfire is an important disturbance to Arctic tundra ecosystems. In the coming decades, tundra fire frequency, intensity, and extent are projected to increase because of anthropogenic climate change. To more accurately predict the effects of climate...

Person: Sae-Lim, Russell, Vachula, Holmes, Mann, Schade, Natali
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Characteristics of the natural fire regime are poorly resolved in the Arctic, even though fire may play an important role cycling carbon stored in tundra vegetation and soils to the atmosphere. In the course of studying vegetation and permafrost-...

Person: Jones, Breen, Gaglioti, Mann, Rocha, Grosse, Arp, Kunz, Walker
Year: 2013
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Many boreal forests grow in regions where climate is now warming rapidly. Changes in these vast, cold forests have the potential to affect global climate because they store huge amounts of carbon and because the relative abundances of their different...

Person: Mann, Rupp, Olson, Duffy
Year: 2012
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Postfire succession in the Alaskan boreal forest follows several different pathways, the most common being self-replacement and species-dominance relay. In self-replacement, canopy-dominant tree species replace themselves as the postfire dominants. It...

Person: Kurkowski, Mann, Rupp, Verbyla
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

[no description entered]

Person: Duffy, Walsh, Graham, Mann, Rupp
Year: 2005
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Deployment, manning, and dispatching are geographically driven activities that respond to geographically based phenomena changes in fire weather, fire danger, and potential fire behavior. Information systems or decision-aids designed to support the...

Person: Alexander, Bisgrove, Feunekes, Methven, Mann
Year: 1990
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

[no description entered]

Person: DeBano, Mann, Hamilton
Year: 1970
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the text ... 'An overview of the Canadian Forest Fire Behavior Prediction (FBP) System has been prepared by Lawson et al. (1985). The FBP System includes the provision for calculating the size and shape of free-burning, wild-driven fires...

Person: Alexander, Smith, Mann
Year: 1988
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Presentation from the 2017 Fall Alaska Fire Science Workshop. Tundra fires were once very rare on Alaska's North Slope, but are now becoming more frequent, probably as a result of climate change. Fire-management need to be highly adaptable during this...

Person: Mann
Year: 2017
Resource Group: Media
Source: FRAMES

Despite its wide geographic distribution and important role in boreal forest fire regimes, little is known about the climate-growth relationships of black spruce (Picea mariana [Mill.] B.S.P.). We used site- and tree-level analyses to evaluate the...

Person: Wolken, Mann, Grant, Lloyd, Rupp, Hollingsworth
Year: 2016
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES