Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Displaying 1 - 10 of 125

Complex, reciprocal interactions among climate, disturbance, and vegetation dramatically alter spatial landscape patterns and influence ecosystem dynamics. As climate and disturbance regimes shift, historical analogs and past empirical studies may not...

Person: Loehman, Keane, Holsinger
Year: 2020
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Wildland fire researchers and fire managers need better estimates of surface fuel loadings but getting accurate estimates takes time and resources. A relatively new fuel sampling system, called the photoload sampling technique, has been developed to...

Person: Keane
Year: 2020
Resource Group: Media
Source: FRAMES

Climate change and associated ecological impacts have challenged many conventional, observation-based approaches for predicting ecosystem and landscape responses to natural resource management. Complex spatial ecological models provide powerful,...

Person: Keane, Loehman, Holsinger
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Continued suppression of wildfires may allow more biomass to accumulate to foster even more intense fires. Enlightened fire management involves explicitly determining concurrent levels of suppression, wildland fire use (allowing some fires to burn) and...

Person: Keane, Gray, Davis, Holsinger, Loehman
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Resilience has become a common goal for science-based natural resource management, particularly in the context of changing climate and disturbance regimes. Integrating varying perspectives and definitions of resilience is a complex and often...

Person: Higuera, Metcalf, Miller, Buma, McWethy, Metcalf, Ratajczak, Nelson, Chaffin, Stedman, McCaffrey, Schoennagel, Harvey, Hood, Schultz, Black, Campbell, Haggerty, Keane, Krawchuk, Kulig, Rafferty, Virapongse
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

The Fire Severity Mapping System project (FIRESEV) is geared toward providing fire managers across the western United States critical information about the potential ecological effects of wildland fire at multiple levels of thematic, spatial, and...

Person: Dillon, Morgan, Keane
Year: 2009
Resource Group: Website
Source: FRAMES

Following wildfire, mountainous areas of the western United States are susceptible to debris flow during intense rainfall. Convective storms that can generate debris flows in recently burned areas may occur during or immediately after the wildfire,...

Person: Staley, Tillery, Kean, McGuire, Pauling, Rengers, Smith
Year: 2018
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Mega-fires are often defined according to their size and intensity but are more accurately described by their socioeconomic impacts. Three factors -- climate change, fire exclusion, and antecedent disturbance, collectively referred to as the 'mega...

Person: Stephens, Burrows, Buyantuyev, Gray, Keane, Kubian, Liu, Seijo, Shu, Tolhurst, van Wagtendonk
Year: 2014
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the introduction ... 'Announcing the release of new software packages for application in wildland fire science and management, two fields that are already fully saturated with computer technology, may seem a bit too much to many managers....

Person: Keane, Dillon, Drury, Innes, Morgan, Lutes, Prichard, Smith, Strand
Year: 2014
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Fire management faces important emergent issues in the coming years such as climate change, fire exclusion impacts, and wildland-urban development, so new, innovative means are needed to address these challenges. Field studies, while preferable and...

Person: Keane, Loehman, Holsinger
Year: 2011
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS