Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Displaying 1 - 10 of 12

A number of watershed partnerships have emerged in the western US to address the impacts of wildfire through investing in wildfire mitigation activities. To motivate collective action and design effective risk mitigation programs, these stakeholders...

Person: Roberts, Jones, Duke, Shinbrot, Harper, Fons, Cheng, Wolk
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Increasing private wildfire risk mitigation is an important part of the larger forest restoration policy challenge. Data from an economic experiment are used to evaluate the effectiveness of providing fuel reductions on public land adjacent to private...

Person: Prante, Little, Jones, McKee, Berrens
Year: 2011
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the text ... 'Our work has shown that a single focal point is critical for efforts -- such as reducing severe wildland fires and the vegetation that fuels them -- that involve many federal agencies as well as state and local governments, the...

Person: Hill, Janik, Belak, Cotton, Dominicci, Johnson, Jones, Joy, Vargas
Year: 2002
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

[no description entered]

Person: Jones, Johnston
Year: 1968
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Social Network Analysis of Disaster Response, Recovery, and Adaptation covers systematic social network analysis and how people and institutions function in disasters, after disasters, and the ways they adapt to hazard settings. As hazards become...

Person: Jones, Faas
Year: 2016
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

If you find yourself working in or with a community at risk from wildfire, it’s because fire is a component of the local ecosystems. This means that your community will be confronted with fire at some time, with the main variables being when, and under...

Person: Jones
Year: 2017
Resource Group: Media
Source: FRAMES

Large wildland fires are complex, costly events influenced by a vast array of physical, climatic, and social factors. Changing climate, fuel buildup due to past suppression, and increasing populations in the wildland-urban interface have all been...

Person: Canton-Thompson, Gebert, Thompson, Jones, Calkin, Donovan
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

We stood with the gray-haired ranger on a high ridge in Oregon overlooking a thousand square miles of forest. [from the text] The night before, my GEOGRAPHIC colleague Jay Johnston and I had watched a particularly violent thunderstorm of the type that...

Person: Jones, Johnston
Year: 1968
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Presents a guide to the operation of MAGIS eXpress, a spatial decision support system. This program spatially schedules treatments and road activities for small landscapes to design vegetation management projects. MAGIS eXpress is designed to install...

Person: Sullivan, Jones, Krueger, Zuuring, Troutwine
Year: 2005
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

This study uses qualitative sociological methodology to discover information and insights about the role of Incident Management Teams in wildland fire suppression costs. We interviewed 48 command and general staff members of Incident Management Teams...

Person: Canton-Thompson, Thompson, Gebert, Calkin, Donovan, Jones
Year: 2006
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES