Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Displaying 1 - 10 of 29

Ben Jones' (Ruffed Grouse Society) presentation to the 2019 Fire in Eastern Oak Forests Conference in State College, PA.

Person: Jones
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Media
Source: FRAMES

Summary1. Clearcut logging results in major changes in ectomycorrhizal fungal communities, but whether this results in the loss of key functional traits, such as those associated with nutrient acquisition from soil organic matter, is unknown....

Person: Jones, Twieg, Ward, Barker, Durall, Simard
Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

This paper assesses the resilience of Alaska's boreal forest system to rapid climatic change. Recent warming is associated with reduced growth of dominant tree species, plant disease and insect outbreaks, warming and thawing of permafrost, drying...

Person: Chapin, McGuire, Ruess, Hollingsworth, Mack, Johnstone, Kasischke, Euskirchen, Jones, Jorgenson, Kielland, Kofinas, Turetsky, Yarie, Lloyd, Taylor
Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

With climatic warming, wildfire occurrence is increasing in the boreal forest of interior Alaska. Loss of catchment vegetation during fire can impact streams directly through altered solute and debris inputs and changed light and temperature regimes....

Person: Betts, Jones
Year: 2009
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

After the containment of large wildland fires, major onsite and downstream effects including lost soil productivity, watershed response, increased vulnerability to invasive weeds, and downstream sedimentation can cause threats to human life and...

Person: Calkin, Jones, Hyde
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Rehabilitation of skid trails, temporary roads, and log landings is required for many harvested sites in British Columbia; however, more information is needed regarding practical methods to return these access areas to productive forest. Lodgepole pine...

Person: Campbell, Bulmer, Jones, Philip, Zwiazek
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Permafrost and fire are important regulators of hydrochemistry and landscape structure in the discontinuous permafrost region of interior Alaska. We examined the influence of permafrost and a prescribed burn on concentrations of dissolved organic...

Person: Petrone, Hinzman, Shibata, Jones, Boone
Year: 2007
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Understanding the trade-off between short-term and long-term consequences of fire impacts on ecosystems is needed before a comprehensive fuels management program can be implemented nationally. We are comparing three vegetation models that may be used...

Person: Neuenschwander, Ryan, Gollberg, Weise, Kimberlin, Arbaugh, Chew, Jones, Merzenich, van Wagtendonk, Wiitala
Year: 2000
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

[no description entered]

Person: Blew, Forman, Hafla, Pellant, Jones, White, Sands, Klahr
Year: 2004
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Current methods for predicting fire-induced mortality in shrubs and trees are largely empirical. These methods do not exhibit a wide range of applicability and are not readily linked to duff burning, soil heating, and surface fire behavior models. New...

Person: Engstrom, Galley, de Groot, Jimenez, Butler, Reardon, Webb, Jones
Year: 2004
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS