Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

Displaying 1 - 7 of 7

After the containment of large wildland fires, major onsite and downstream effects including lost soil productivity, watershed response, increased vulnerability to invasive weeds, and downstream sedimentation can cause threats to human life and...

Person: Calkin, Jones, Hyde
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Large wildland fires are complex, costly events influenced by a vast array of physical, climatic, and social factors. Changing climate, fuel buildup due to past suppression, and increasing populations in the wildland-urban interface have all been...

Person: Canton-Thompson, Gebert, Thompson, Jones, Calkin, Donovan
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

After the containment of large wildland fires, major onsite and downstream effects including lost soil productivity, watershed response, increased vulnerability to invasive weeds, and downstream sedimentation can cause threats to human life and...

Person: Calkin, Jones, Hyde
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Wildfire effects include loss of vegetative cover and changes to soil properties that may lead to secondary effects of increased runoff, erosion, flooding, sedimentation, and vulnerability to invasive weeds. These secondary effects may threaten human...

Person: Calkin, Hyde, Robichaud, Jones, Ashmun, Loeffler
Year: 2007
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

This study uses qualitative sociological methodology to discover information and insights about the role of Incident Management Teams in wildland fire suppression costs. We interviewed 48 command and general staff members of Incident Management Teams...

Person: Canton-Thompson, Thompson, Gebert, Calkin, Donovan, Jones
Year: 2006
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

The increased scrutiny of all wildfire related expenditures requires improvements in cost-benefit accounting systems including methods to assess values-at-risk downstream of burned areas. Working under very tight timelines, Burned Area Emergency...

Person: Robichaud, Calkin, Jones, Saveland
Year: 2007
Resource Group: Project
Source: FRAMES

Extreme fire seasons in recent years and associated high suppression expenditures have brought about a chorus of calls for reform of federal firefighting structure and policy. Given the political nature of the topic, a critical review of past trends in...

Person: Calkin, Gebert, Jones, Neilson
Year: 2005
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS