Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Displaying 1 - 10 of 94

Fire smoke is a major contributor to both particulate matter (PM) and ozone exposure in urban centers. Epidemiological, clinical, and toxicological studies have demonstrated a casual relationship between these pollutants and cardiovascular and...

Person: Reich, Rappold, Johnston, Morgan, Fann, Cope, Broome
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Fire smoke is a major contributor to both particulate matter (PM) and ozone exposure in urban centers. Epidemiological, clinical, and toxicological studies have demonstrated a casual relationship between these pollutants and cardiovascular and...

Person: Reich, Broome, Cope, Fann, Johnston, Morgan, Rappold
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Project
Source: FRAMES

Exposure to forest fire smoke is episodic, which makes its health effects challenging to study. We review the newest contributions to a growing literature on acute respiratory outcomes.

Person: Henderson, Johnston
Year: 2012
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Presented by Jill Johnstone at the 2018 Alaska Fire Science Consortium Spring Fire Science Workshop.

Person: Johnstone
Year: 2018
Resource Group: Media
Source: FRAMES

Presented by Randi Jandt and Jill Johnstone. From the 2018 Bonanza Creek LTER symposium, April 6, 2018.

Person: Jandt, Johnstone
Year: 2018
Resource Group: Media
Source: FRAMES

Climate change has increased the occurrence, severity, and impact of disturbances on forested ecosystems worldwide, resulting in a need to identify factors that contribute to an ecosystem's resilience or capacity to recover from disturbance....

Person: Walker, Mack, Johnstone
Year: 2017
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Introduction: Wildland fires degrade air quality and adversely affect human health. A growing body of epidemiology literature reports increased rates of emergency departments, hospital admissions and premature deaths from wildfire smoke exposure....

Person: Fann, Alman, Broome, Morgan, Johnston, Pouliot, Rappold
Year: 2018
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

In an effort to reduce CO2 emissions from fossil fuel burning, renewable energy policies incentivize use of forest biomass as an energy source. Many governments have assumed (legislated) the carbon flux from burning biomass to be neutral because...

Person: Johnston, van Kooten
Year: 2015
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

In the boreal forest of Alaska, increased fire severity associated with climate change is expanding deciduous forest cover in areas previously dominated by black spruce (Picea mariana). Needle-leaf conifer and broad-leaf deciduous species are commonly...

Person: Melvin, Mack, Johnstone, McGuire, Genet, Schuur
Year: 2015
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

In our 2011 synthesis (Bowman et al., Journal of Biogeography, 2011, 38, 2223-2236), we argued for a holistic approach to human issues in fire science that we term 'pyrogeography'. Coughlan & Petty (Journal of Biogeography, 2013, 40, 1010...

Person: Roos, Bowman, Balch, Artaxo, Bond, Cochrane, D'Antonio, DeFries, Mack, Johnston, Krawchuk, Kull, Moritz, Pyne, Scott, Swetnam
Year: 2014
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS