Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Displaying 1 - 10 of 195

Most landscape-scale fire severity research relies on correlations between field measures of fire effects and relatively simple spectral reflectance indices that are not direct measures of heat output or changes in plant physiology. Although many...

Person: Smith, Sparks, Kolden, Abatzoglou, Talhelm, Johnson, Boschetti, Lutz, Apostol, Yedinak, Tinkham, Kremens
Year: 2016
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Wildfire risk in temperate forests has become a nearly intractable problem that can be characterized as a socioecological 'pathology': that is, a set of complex and problematic interactions among social and ecological systems across multiple...

Person: Fischer, Spies, Steelman, Moseley, Johnson, Bailey, Ager, Bourgeron, Charnley, Collins, Kline, Leahy, Littell, Millington, Nielsen-Pincus, Olsen, Paveglio, Roos, Steen-Adams, Stevens, Vukomanovic, White, Bowman
Year: 2016
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the text ... 'The QFR [Quadrennial Defense Review] is not a formal policy or decision document, but rather a strategic evaluation of the potential future circumstances and long-range direction of wildland fire managment. It is designed to...

Person: Burnett, Johnson
Year: 2015
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

[1] Large lightning wildfires in Canada and Alaska account for most of the area burnt and are main determiners of the age mosaic of the landscape. Such fires occur when positive midtroposphere height anomalies persist > 10 days during the fire...

Person: Fauria, Johnson
Year: 2006
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

The existence of non-serotinous, non-sprouting species in fire regimes where serotiny confers an adaptive advantage is puzzling, particularly when these species recruit poorly from soil seed banks or from burn edges. In this paper, white spruce (Picea...

Person: Michaletz, Johnson, Mell, Greene
Year: 2013
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

The area burned in the North American boreal forest is controlled by the frequency of mid-tropospheric blocking highs that cause rapid fuel drying. Climate controls the area burned through changing the dynamics of large-scale teleconnection patterns (...

Person: Fauria, Johnson
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Elevated CO2 increases root growth and fine (diam. £2 mm) root growth across a range of species and experimental conditions. However, there is no clear evidence that elevated CO2 changes the proportion of C allocated to root biomass, measured as either...

Person: Tingey, Phillips, Johnson
Year: 2000
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

We used an information-theoretic model comparison approach to investigate the influence of forest stand attributes resulting from wildfire on the occupancy of winter habitats by barren-ground caribou (Rangifer tarandus groenlandicus) in the Northwest...

Person: Barrier, Johnson
Year: 2012
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

• It is widely assumed that post-fire tree mortality results from necrosis of phloem and vascular cambium in stems, despite strong evidence that reduced xylem conductivity also plays an important role.• In this study, experiments with Populus...

Person: Michaletz, Johnson, Tyree
Year: 2012
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Post-fire storage of carbon (C) in organic-soil horizons was measured in one Canadian and three Alaskan chronosequences in black spruce forests, together spanning stand ages of nearly 200 yrs. We used a simple mass balance model to derive estimates of...

Person: Harden, Manies, O'Donnell, Johnson, Frolking, Fan
Year: 2012
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS