Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Displaying 1 - 10 of 82

Wildfires are a major driver of ecosystem development and contributor to carbon emissions in boreal forests. We analyzed the contribution of fires of different fire size classes to the total burned area and suggest a novel fire characteristic, the...

Person: Lehsten, de Groot, Flannigan, George, Harmand, Balzter
Year: 2014
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Research activities focused on estimating the direct emissions of carbon from wildland fires across North America are reviewed as part of the North American Carbon Program disturbance synthesis. A comparison of methods to estimate the loss of carbon...

Person: French, de Groot, Jenkins, Rogers, Alvarado, Amiro, de Jong, Goetz, Hoy, Hyer, Keane, Law, McKenzie, McNulty, Ottmar, Perez-Salicrup, Randerson, Robertson, Turetsky
Year: 2011
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

The boreal biome is characterised by extensive wildfires that frequently burn into the thick organic soils found in many forests and wetlands. Previous studies investigating surface fuel consumption generally have not accounted for variation in the...

Person: Benscoter, Thompson, Waddington, Flannigan, Wotton, de Groot, Turetsky
Year: 2011
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Wildland fire is a global phenomenon, and a result of interactions between climate-weather, fuels and people. Our climate is changing rapidly primarily through the release of greenhouse gases that may have profound and possibly unexpected impacts on...

Person: Flannigan, Krawchuk, de Groot, Wotton, Gowman
Year: 2009
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

The severity of a burn for post-fire ecological effects has been assessed with the composite burn index (CBI) and the differenced Normalized Burn Ratio (dNBR). This study assessed the relationship between these two variables across recently burned...

Person: Hall, Freeburn, de Groot, Pritchard, Lynham, Landry
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Wildland fires burn several hundred million hectares of vegetation every year, and increased fire activity has been reported in many global regions. Many of these fires have had serious negative impacts on human safety, health, regional economies,...

Person: Viegas, de Groot, Goldammer, Keenan, Brady, Lynham, Justice, Csiszar, O'Loughlin
Year: 2006
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

[no description entered]

Person: Fleming, Candau, McAlpine, de Groot
Year: 2004
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

[no description entered]

Person: Groot, Gauthier, Bergeron
Year: 2004
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Lightning-initiated forest fires are common to the western boreal forest and have important consequences for ecosystem carbon (C) storage in upland systems. Despite the importance of peat-accumulating lowlands to soil C stocks, little is known about...

Person: Engstrom, Galley, de Groot, Turetsky, Halsey, Vitt, Wieder
Year: 2004
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Fire in peatlands directly releases carbon to the atmosphere through combustion of biomass. Assuming that 1,470 km2 of peatland burns annually in boreal, continental, western Canada (Alberta, Saskatchewan, and Manitoba), projected carbon losses of 2.2...

Person: Engstrom, Galley, de Groot, Benscoter, Wieder, Vitt, Halsey
Year: 2004
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS