Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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There is mounting concern that global wildfire activity is shifting in frequency, intensity and seasonality in response to climate change. Fuel moisture provides a powerful means of detecting changing fire potential. Here, we use global burned area and...

Person: Ellis, Bowman, Jain, Flannigan, Williamson
Year: 2022
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Vegetation fires are an essential component of the Earth system but can also cause substantial economic losses, severe air pollution, human mortality and environmental damage. Contemporary fire regimes are increasingly impacted by human activities and...

Person: Bowman, Kolden, Abatzoglou, Johnston, Van der Werf, Flannigan
Year: 2020
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Spring fire activity has increased in parts of Canada, particularly in the west, prompting fire managers to seek indicators of potential activity before the fire season starts. The overwintering adjustment of the Canadian Fire Weather Index System’s...

Person: Krezek-Hanes, Wotton, Woolford, Martell, Flannigan
Year: 2020
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

The size and frequency of large wildfires in western North America have increased in recent years, a trend climate change is likely to exacerbate. Due to fuel limitations, recently burned forests resist burning for upwards of 30 years; however, extreme...

Person: Whitman, Parisien, Thompson, Flannigan
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Wildfire management agencies in Canada are at a tipping point. Presuppression and suppression costs are increasing but program budgets are not. Climate change impacts and increasing interface values-at-risk are challenging suppression effectiveness and...

Person: Tymstra, Stocks, Cai, Flannigan
Year: 2020
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Wildfire in boreal permafrost peatlands causes a thickening and warming of the seasonally thawed active layer, exposing large amounts of soil carbon to microbial processes and potential release as greenhouse gases. In this study, conducted in the...

Person: Gibson, Estop-Aragonés, Flannigan, Thompson, Olefeldt
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

The large mediatic coverage of recent massive wildfires across the world has emphasized the vulnerability of freshwater resources. The extensive hydrogeomorphic effects from a wildfire can impair the ability of watersheds to provide safe drinking water...

Person: Robinne, Bladon, Miller, Parisien, Mathieu, Flannigan
Year: 2018
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Wildland fire management has reached a crossroads. Current perspectives are not capable of answering interdisciplinary adaptation and mitigation challenges posed by increases in wildfire risk to human populations and the need to reintegrate fire as a...

Person: Smith, Kolden, Paveglio, Cochrane, Bowman, Moritz, Kliskey, Alessa, Hudak, Hoffman, Lutz, Queen, Goetz, Higuera, Boschetti, Flannigan, Yedinak, Watts, Strand, van Wagtendonk, Anderson, Stocks, Abatzoglou
Year: 2016
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

In Canadian forests, the majority of burned area occurs on a small number of days of extreme fire weather. These days lie within the tail end of the distribution of fire weather, and are often the periods when fire suppression capacity is most...

Person: Wang, Thompson, Marshall, Tymstra, Carr, Flannigan
Year: 2015
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Wildfires are a major driver of ecosystem development and contributor to carbon emissions in boreal forests. We analyzed the contribution of fires of different fire size classes to the total burned area and suggest a novel fire characteristic, the...

Person: Lehsten, de Groot, Flannigan, George, Harmand, Balzter
Year: 2014
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS