Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Displaying 1 - 10 of 273

A statement by the Wildland Fire Leadership Council and their partners relating to the benefits of prescribed fire programs.

Person:
Year: 2020
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Despite the low annual temperatures and short growing seasons that are characteristic of high northern latitudes (HNL), wildland fire is the dominant ecological disturbance within the region's boreal forest, the world's largest terrestrial biome. The...

Person: York, Bhatt, Gargulinski, Grabinski, Jain, Soja, Thoman, Ziel
Year: 2020
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Wildland fire suppression presents a working environment that often exceeds an energy expenditure of 20 MJ/day, however maladaptive responses to adiposity and blood lipid profiles have been noted. We recruited wildland firefighters (WLFF), (n=100, 92...

Person: Dodds, Rosales, Hailes, Sol, Coker, Quindry, Ruby
Year: 2020
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Wildland fire emissions from both wildfires and prescribed fires represent a major component of overall U.S. emissions. Obtaining an accurate, time-resolved inventory of these emissions is important for many purposes, including to account for emissions...

Person: Larkin, Raffuse, Huang, Pavlovic, Lahm, Rao
Year: 2020
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Convective storms produce heavier downpours and become more intense with climate change. Such changes could be even amplified in high-latitudes since the Arctic is warming faster than any other region in the world and subsequently moistening. However,...

Person: Poujol, Prein, Newman
Year: 2020
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Previous research indicates that the effects of climate warming, including shrub expansion and increased fire frequency may lead to declining lichen abundance in arctic tundra and northern alpine areas. Lichens are important forage for caribou (...

Person: Macander, Palm, Frost, Herriges, Nelson, Roland, Russell, Suitor, Bentzen, Joly, Goetz, Hebblewhite
Year: 2020
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Caribou from studied Canada and Alaska herds avoided burned areas, especially in winter and at larger spatial and temporal scales.

Person: Palm
Year: 2020
Resource Group: Media
Source: FRAMES

Fire severity affects both ecosystem N-loss and post-fire N-balance. Climate change is altering the fire regime of interior Alaska, although the effects on Siberian alder (Alnus viridis ssp. fruticosa) annual N-fixation input (kg N ha-1 yr-1) and...

Person: Houseman, Ruess, Hollingsworth, Verbyla
Year: 2020
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Culture influences how fire is perceived and managed in societies. An increasing risk of catastrophic wildfire has shifted political and academic attention on the use of Indigenous fire management (IFM) as an alternative to the common fire suppression...

Person: Nikolakis, Roberts
Year: 2020
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

A topological data analysis (TDA) of 200,000 U.S. wildfires larger than 5 acres indicates that events with the largest final burned areas are associated with systematically low fuel moistures, low precipitation, and high vapor pressure deficits in the...

Person: Bendick, Hoylman
Year: 2020
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES