Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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The following list of fire research topics and questions were generated by the agencies and organizations within AWFCG during 2016 Fall Fire Review and through other solicitations. The topics were initially ranked by the AWFCG Fire Research,...

Person: York
Year: 2017
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Statistical models using historical observations are a critical tool for anticipating future fire regimes. A key uncertainty with these models is the ability to project outside the range of historical observations, often done when making future...

Person: Young, Higuera, Abatzoglou, Duffy, Hu
Year: 2017
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Climate change has increased the occurrence, severity, and impact of disturbances on forested ecosystems worldwide, resulting in a need to identify factors that contribute to an ecosystem's resilience or capacity to recover from disturbance....

Person: Walker, Mack, Johnstone
Year: 2017
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Wildland fire fighting is a high-risk occupation requiring considerable physical and psychological demands. Multiple agencies publish fatality summaries for wildland firefighters; however, the reported number and types vary. At least five different...

Person: Butler, Marsh, Domitrovich, Helmkamp
Year: 2017
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Wildfire and the threat it poses to society represents an example of the complex, dynamic relationship between social and ecological systems. Increasingly, wildfire adaptation is posited as a pathway to shift the approach to fire from a suppression...

Person: Brenkert-Smith, Meldrum, Champ, Barth
Year: 2017
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

The economic and ecological costs of wildfire in the United States have risen substantially in recent decades. Although climate change has likely enabled a portion of the increase in wildfire activity, the direct role of people in increasing wildfire...

Person: Balch, Bradley, Abatzoglou, Nagy, Fusco, Mahood
Year: 2017
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

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Person: Harshberger
Year: 1903
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Aerosols emitted by landscape fires affect many climatic processes. Here, we combined an aerosol–climate model and a coupled climate-carbon model to study the carbon cycle and climate effects caused by fire-emitted aerosols (FEA) forcing at the top of...

Person: Landry, Partanen, Matthews
Year: 2017
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

Much research has been carried out on the potential impacts of climate change on forest fire activity in the boreal forest. Indeed, there is a general consensus that, while change will vary regionally across the vast extent of the boreal, in general...

Person: Wotton, Flannigan, Marshall
Year: 2017
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Under projected patterns of climate change, models predict an increase in wildland fire activity in Alaska, which is likely to strain the capacity of the fire governance system under current arrangements (Melvin et al., 2017; Pastick et al., 2017). The...

Person: Rutherford, Schultz
Year: 2017
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES