Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Displaying 1 - 10 of 54

Fire growth models in WFDSS worksheet with answers from the 2012 Fire Modeling Workshop

Person: Stratton
Year: 2012
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Geospatial fire modeling considerations in Alaska handout from the 2012 Fire Modeling Workshop

Person: Stratton
Year: 2012
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Dr. Carissa Brown, Postdoctoral Researcher at the University of Sherbrooke, joined us for a webinar on February 23, 2012 (11:00 am to noon AKST) entitled 'Once burned, twice shy: Repeat fires result in black spruce regeneration failure.' Dr. Brown is...

Person:
Year: 2012
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

From the Conclusions ... 'Fires have impacted cultures for millennia and fire will continue to impact contemporary cultures as well as the remnants of past cultures. The challenge is to manage vagetation/fuels to minimize damage to contemporary...

Person: Ryan, Jones, Koerner, Lee, Ryan, Koerner
Year: 2012
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Boreal forest fires are an important source of terrestrial carbon emissions, particularly during years of widespread wildfires. Most carbon emission models parameterize wildfire impacts and carbon flux to area burned by fires, therein making the...

Person: Kolden, Abatzoglou
Year: 2012
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Climate change incurs costs, but government adaptation budgets are limited. Beyond a certain point, individuals must bear the costs or adapt to new circumstances, creating political-economic tipping points that we explore in three examples. First, many...

Person: Huntington, Goodstein, Euskirchen
Year: 2012
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Recent large and frequent fires above the Alaskan arctic circle have forced a reassessment of the ecological and climatological importance of fire in arctic tundra ecosystems. Here we provide a general overview of the occurrence, distribution, and...

Person: Rocha, Loranty, Higuera, Mack, Hu, Jones, Breen, Rastetter, Goetz, Shaver
Year: 2012
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the text ... 'Wildland fire managers face increasingly steep challenges to meet air quality standards while planning prescribed fire and its inevitable smoke emissions. The goals of sound fire management practices, including fuel load...

Person: LeQuire, Hunter
Year: 2012
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Many boreal forests grow in regions where climate is now warming rapidly. Changes in these vast, cold forests have the potential to affect global climate because they store huge amounts of carbon and because the relative abundances of their different...

Person: Mann, Rupp, Olson, Duffy
Year: 2012
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

We used an information-theoretic model comparison approach to investigate the influence of forest stand attributes resulting from wildfire on the occupancy of winter habitats by barren-ground caribou (Rangifer tarandus groenlandicus) in the Northwest...

Person: Barrier, Johnson
Year: 2012
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS