Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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This document summarizes the 2011 AFSC workshop. Topics discussed included boreal fire history datasets in Alaska, fire return intervals in boreal forests, the Probabilistic Fire Analysis System (PFAS), the Canadian Wildland Fire Strategy, impacts of...

Person:
Year: 2011
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Vegetation health can be monitored using a time series of remotely sensed images by calculating the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI). We assessed temporal trends throughout an NDVI time series with three sensors: Advanced Very High...

Person: Parent
Year: 2011
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Climate has warmed substantially in boreal Alaska since the mid-1970s. The direct effects of rising temperatures on sub-Arctic ecosystems are already being observed in the form of drought stress, increased fire frequency and severity, and increased...

Person: Baird
Year: 2011
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

I hypothesize that the distribution of barren-ground caribou (Rangifer tarandus granti) is affected by multiple, interrelated factors. These factors include, but are not limited to, terrain and snow characteristics as well as predation pressure and...

Person: Joly
Year: 2011
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Climate warming and drying are modifying the fire dynamics of many boreal forests, moving them towards a regime with a higher frequency of extreme fire years characterized by large burns of high severity. Plot-scale studies indicate that increased burn...

Person: Beck, Goetz, Mack, Alexander, Jin, Randerson, Loranty
Year: 2011
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Global vegetation models predict that boreal forests are particularly sensitive to a biome shift during the 21st century. This shift would manifest itself first at the biome's margins, with evergreen forest expanding into current tundra while...

Person: Beck, Juday, Alix, Barber, Winslow, Sousa, Heiser, Herriges, Goetz
Year: 2011
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Fire is a keystone process in many ecosystems of western North America. Severe fires kill and consume large amounts of above- and belowground biomass and affect soils, resulting in long-lasting consequences for vegetation, aquatic ecosystem...

Person: Dillon, Holden, Morgan, Crimmins, Heyerdahl, Luce
Year: 2011
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Description not entered.

Person: Searby
Year: 1975
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES