Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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FireCLIME (Fire-Climate Landscape Interactions in Montane Ecosystems) Vulnerability Assessment v3.1 is a macro-enabled Excel file (xlsm). A user guide is also available below.

Person: Friggens
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Tool
Source: FRAMES

This report assesses how carbon stocks at regional scales and in individual national forests are affected by factors such as timber harvesting, natural disturbances, climate variability, increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations, and...

Person: Birdsey, Dugan, Healey, Dante-Wood, Zhang, Ho, Chen, Hernandez, Raymond, McCarter
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Novel fire regimes are expected in many boreal regions, and it is unclear how biogeochemical cycles will respond. We leverage fire and vegetation records from a highly flammable ecoregion in Alaska and present new lake-sediment analyses to examine...

Person: Chipman, Hu
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Before the advent of intensive forest management and fire suppression, western North American forests exhibited a naturally occurring resistance and resilience to wildfires and other disturbances. Resilience, which encompasses resistance, reflects the...

Person: Hessburg, Miller, Parks, Povak, Taylor, Higuera, Prichard, North, Collins, Hurteau, Larson, Allen, Stephens, Rivera-Huerta, Stevens-Rumann, Daniels, Gedalof, Gray, Kane, Churchill, Hagmann, Spies, Cansler, Belote, Veblen, Battaglia, Hoffman, Skinner, Safford, Salter
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Presented by: Randi Jandt, Alaska Fire Science Consortium

November 20th, 2019

Powerpoint presentation from Special Session Fire in the Last Frontier: 21st Century Fire Patterns, Behavior, and Pyroecology of North American Boreal Forests...

Person: Jandt
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Media
Source: FRAMES

Presented by: Carson Baughman, USGS, Alaska Science Center

November 19th, 2019

Powerpoint presentation from Special Session Fire in the Last Frontier: 21st Century Fire Patterns, Behavior, and Pyroecology of North American Boreal Forests...

Person: Baughman
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Media
Source: FRAMES

Decision makers need better methods for identifying critical ecosystem vulnerabilities to changing climate and fire regimes. Climate-wildfire-vegetation interactions are complex and hinder classification and projection necessary for development of...

Person: Friggens, Loehman, Thode, Flatley, Evans, Bunn, Wilcox, Mueller, Yocom, Falk
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Under projected patterns of climate change, models predict an increase in wildland fire activity in Alaska, which is likely to strain the capacity of the fire governance system under current arrangements. The Alaska wildland fire governance system...

Person: Schultz, Duffy, Rutherford, Jandt, Fresco
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Boreal forest fires emit large amounts of carbon into the atmosphere primarily through the combustion of soil organic matter1,2,3. During each fire, a portion of this soil beneath the burned layer can escape combustion, leading to a net accumulation of...

Person: Walker, Baltzer, Cumming, Day, Ebert, Goetz, Johnstone, Potter, Rogers, Schuur, Turetsky, Mack
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

High-latitude regions have experienced rapid warming in recent decades, and this trend is projected to continue over the twenty-first century1. Fire is also projected to increase with warming2,3. We show here, consistent with changes during the...

Person: Mekonnen, Riley, Randerson, Grant, Rogers
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES