Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

Filter Results

Year

Person

Displaying 1 - 10 of 31

Raging wildfires have devastated vast areas of California and Australia in recent years, and predictions are that we will see more of the same in coming years as a result of climate change. But this is nothing new. Since the dawn of life on land, large...

Person: Scott
Year: 2018
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

The Arctic is warming at an alarming rate, yet the processes that contribute to the enhanced warming are not well understood. Arctic aerosols have been targeted in studies for decades due to their consequential impacts on the energy budget, both...

Person: Creamean, Maahn, de Boer, McComiskey, Sedlacek, Feng
Year: 2018
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Preliminary findings on recovery of 6 tundra and forest-tundra sites that burned in 2012 in NWT.  Development of post-fire plant communities is controlled by burn severity.

Person: Chen
Year: 2018
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

This project provided an integrated assessment of the effects of fires under different future climate and population scenarios on fine particulate matter mass (PM2.5) and ozone (O3) at global scale, with a particular focus on the United States. We...

Person: Val Martin, Pierce, Heald
Year: 2018
Resource Group: Data
Source: FRAMES

Common practices for invasive species control and management include physical, chemical, and biological approaches. The first two approaches have clear limitations and may lead to unintended (negative) consequences, unless carefully planned and...

Person: Guo, Brockway, Larson, Wang, Ren
Year: 2018
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Some forest managers have had concerns that prescribed burning after drought will stress mature pines, and increase their susceptibility to beetle attack. However, this concern resulted in many missed opportunities for applying fire after a recent...

Person: Coyle
Year: 2018
Resource Group: Media
Source: FRAMES

Fire is the dominant ecological disturbance process in boreal forests (coniferous forests consisting mostly of pines, spruces, and larches) and fire frequency, size and severity are increasing in Alaska owing to climate warming. However, interactions...

Person: Falke, Gray
Year: 2018
Resource Group: Media
Source: FRAMES

The incidence and degree of stand disturbance (that is, from fre, insects, and disease) are driving excess tree mortality in the Western United States. Hot and dry conditions associated with drought have stressed forests over a wide geographic area,...

Person: Briggs
Year: 2018
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

October 9th, 2018. Part of the Alaska Fire Science Consortium workshop, the presentation introduced the project on fire effects on boreal aquatic ecosystems.

Person: Falke
Year: 2018
Resource Group: Media
Source: FRAMES

Managers need information about the vulnerability of historical plant communities, and their potential future conditions, to respond appropriately to landscape change driven by global climate change. We model the climate envelopes of plant communities...

Person: Magness, Morton
Year: 2018
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES