Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Displaying 1 - 10 of 32

When spruce beetles (Dendroctonus rufipennis) thin a forest canopy, surviving trees grow more rapidly for decades until the canopy closes and growth is suppressed through competition.We used measurements of tree rings to detect such growth releases and...

Person: Berg, Henry, Fastie, De Volder, Matsuoka
Year: 2006
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Wildfire can lead to considerable hydrological and geomorphological change, both directly by weathering bedrock surfaces and changing soil structure and properties, and indirectly through the effects of changes to the soil and vegetation on...

Person: Shakesby, Doerr
Year: 2006
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Ecosystems change in response to factors such as climate variability, invasions, and wildfires. Most records used to assess such change are based on short-term ecological data or satellite imagery spanning only a few decades. In many instances it is...

Person: Willis, Birks
Year: 2006
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

We report measurements and analysis of a boreal forest fire, integrating the effects of greenhouse gases, aerosols, black carbon deposition on snow and sea ice, and postfire changes in surface albedo. The net effect of all agents was to increase...

Person: Randerson, Liu, Flanner, Chambers, Jin, Hess, Pfister, Mack, Treseder, Welp, Chapin, Harden, Goulden, Lyons, Neff, Schuur, Zender
Year: 2006
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Caribou are an integral component of high-latitude ecosystems and represent a major subsistence food source for many northern people. The availability and quality of winter habitat is critical to sustain these caribou populations. Caribou commonly use...

Person: Rupp, Olson, Adams, Dale, Joly, Henkelman, Collins, Starfield
Year: 2006
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

[no description entered]

Person: White, Pendleton, Pendleton
Year: 2006
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

[no description entered]

Person: Jones, Johnston
Year: 1968
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

[no description entered]

Person: Radford
Year: 1968
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Through a review of literature, the essential role of fire in the boreal forest as a natural regulatory agent of composition and succession is discussed in terms of plants, soils, and animals. In natural, long-term cycles, the incidence of lightning-...

Person: Kayll
Year: 1968
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

A rational approach to monitoring and assessment is prerequisite for sustainable management of ecosystem resources. This features innovative ways to advance the concept of monitoring ecosystem sustainability across spheres of environmental concern,...

Person: Aguirre-Bravo, Pellicane, Burns, Draggan
Year: 2006
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES