Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Displaying 1 - 10 of 35

Climate is changing across a range of scales, from local to global, but ecological consequences remain difficult to understand and predict. Such projections are complicated by change in the connectivity of resources, particularly water, nutrients, and...

Person: Marshall, Blair, Peters, Okin, Rango, Williams
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Burned area is a critical input to the algorithms of biomass burning emissions and understanding variability in fire activity due to climate change but it is difficult to estimate. This study presents a robust algorithm to reconstruct the patterns in...

Person: Zhang, Kondragunta
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) began studies of the winter range of the Western Arctic Caribou Herd (WACH) in 1981. Twenty permanent vegetation transects were deployed within the Buckland River valley on the northeastern side of the Seward...

Person: Joly, Jandt
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Coupled climate models and recent observational evidence suggest that Arctic sea ice may undergo abrupt periods of loss during the next fifty years. Here, we evaluate how rapid sea ice loss affects terrestrial Arctic climate and ground thermal state in...

Person: Lawrence, Slater, Tomas, Holland, Deser
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Shrub encroachment into grass-dominated biomes is occurring globally due to a variety of anthropogenic activities, but the consequences for carbon (C) inputs, storage and cycling remain unclear. We studied eight North American graminoid-dominated...

Person: Knapp, Briggs, Collins, Archer, Bret-Harte, Ewers, Peters, Young, Shaver, Pendall, Cleary
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Plant communities in natural ecosystems are changing and species are being lost due to anthropogenic impacts including global warming and increasing nitrogen (N) deposition. We removed dominant species, combinations of species and entire functional...

Person: Bret-Harte, Mack, Goldsmith, Sloan, DeMarco, Shaver, Ray, Biesinger, Chapin
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

The boreal forest is the largest terrestrial biome in North America and holds a large portion of the world's reactive soil carbon. Therefore, understanding soil carbon accumulation on a landscape or regional scale across the boreal forest is...

Person: Hollingsworth, Schuur, Chapin, Walker
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Ecosystems influence climate through multiple pathways, primarily by changing the energy, water, and greenhouse-gas balance of the atmosphere. Consequently, efforts to mitigate climate change through modification of one pathway, as with carbon in the...

Person: Chapin, Randerson, McGuire, Foley, Field
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

This report provides a preliminary review of adaptation options for climate-sensitive ecosystems and resources in the United States. The term 'adaptation' in this document refers to adjustments in human social systems (e.g., management) in...

Person: Julius, West, Baron, Joyce, Griffith, Kareiva, Keller, Palmer, Peterson, Scott
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Making input decisions under climate uncertainty often involves two-stage methods that use expensive and opaque transfer functions. This article describes an alternative, single-stage approach to such decisions using forecasting methods. The example...

Person: Prestemon, Donovan
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS