Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Person: Kozlowski, Ahlgren, Vogl
Year: 1974
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

From introduction: 'Long ago, Fernow wrote concerning 'the desirability of utilizing the Weather Bureau, the various agricultural experiment stations, and other forces, in forming a systematic service of water stations, and in making a...

Person: Patric, Black
Year: 1968
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Description not entered.

Person: Viereck
Year: 1974
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

The Very High Resolution Radiometer of NOAA-2 and -3 can successfully locate and identify thunderstorms. Since lightning fires account for more than 90 percent of the acreage burned by forest fires in Alaska, this imagery promises to be a useful tool...

Person: Jayaweera, Ahlnas
Year: 1974
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

Periodic outbreaks of black-headed budworms have been reported in southeast Alaska and on Prince William Sound since 1917. The 1950's outbreak caused severe defoliation of mature hemlock and almost one-third of net volume was lost in some stands....

Person: Hard
Year: 1974
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

The purpose of this paper is to indicate that lightning has a pervading influence on all trophic levels in the biological community, and that it affects the physical environment as well.

Person: Taylor
Year: 1974
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

[From the text] Fire has been an integral part of America's wildlands for millions of years. The only environments not experiencing fire as a significant ecological factor were those that remained very cold, very wet, or very dry, and even in...

Person: Agee
Year: 1974
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS