Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Displaying 1 - 10 of 16

Wildfire activity is projected to increase through upcoming decades in boreal Canada due to climatic changes. Amongst the proposed strategies to offset the climate-driven fire risk is the introduction of broadleaf species into dense-coniferous...

Person: Girardin, Terrier
Year: 2015
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the introduction:'This Technical Note is an attempt to summarize what has been done in a number of areas of the world to provide adequate forecasts of fire danger in terms of past, present and forecast weather conditions. It is not intended...

Person:
Year: 1961
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Applying fuel reduction treatments (FRTs) to forested landscapes can alleviate undesirable changes in wildfire benefits and costs due to climate change. A conceptual framework was developed for determining the preferred FRTs across planning periods,...

Person: Prato
Year: 2015
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

This study examines the statistical association of wildfire risk with climatic conditions and non-climate variables in 48 continental US states. Because the response variable “wildfire risk” is a fractional variable bounded between zero and one, we use...

Person: An, Gan, Cho
Year: 2015
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

Alaska, the great northern frontier of America, is being reshaped by climate change. While rising temperatures are altering its character and landscape, they are also bringing the ravages of wildfires. In the past 60 years, Alaska has warmed more than...

Person: Sanford, Wang, Kenward
Year: 2015
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

This research is designed to understand the mechanistic connections among vegetation, the organic soil layer, and permafrost ground stability in Alaskan boreal ecosystems. Understanding these linkages is critical for projecting the impact of climate...

Person: Schuur, McGuire, Johnstone, Mack, Rupp, Euskirchen, Genet, Melvin, Frey, Jean, Walker, Tissier
Year: 2015
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Climate controls the magnitude, duration, and frequency of weather conditions associated with extreme fire behavior. In a warming climate, we are experienc­ing earlier snowmelt, longer fire seasons, and greater incidence of drought. We expect these...

Person: Reinhardt
Year: 2015
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

The Third National Climate Assessment (NCA) process for the United States focused in part on developing a system of indicators to communicate key aspects of the physical climate, climate impacts, vulnerabilities, and preparedness to inform...

Person: Heath, Anderson, Emery, Hicke, Littell, Lucier, Masek, Peterson, Pouyat, Potter, Robertson, Sperry, Bytnerowicz, Jovan, Mockrin, Musselman, Schulz, Smith, Stewart
Year: 2015
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Fire is an integral Earth system process, playing an important role in the distribution of terrestrial ecosystems and affecting the carbon cycle at the global scale. Fire activity is controlled by a number of biophysical factors, including climate,...

Person: Bedía, Herrera, Gutiérrez, Benali, Brands, Mota, Moreno
Year: 2015
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

Globally, wildfire size, severity, and frequency have been increasing, as have related fatalities and taxpayer-funded firefighting costs (1). In most accessible forests, wildfire response prioritizes suppression because fires are easier and cheaper to...

Person: North, Stephens, Collins, Agee, Aplet, Franklin, Fulé
Year: 2015
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES