Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Displaying 1 - 10 of 17

The strategy known as wildland fire use, in which lightning-ignited fires are allowed to burn, is rapidly gaining momentum in the fire management community. Managers need to know the consequences of an increase in area burned that might result from an...

Person: Miller
Year: 2007
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Old growth in the frequent-fire conifer forests of the western United States, such as those containing ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa), Jeffrey pine (P. jeffreyi), giant sequoia (Sequioa giganteum) and other species, has undergone major changes since...

Person: Abella, Covington, Fulé, Lentile, Sánchez Meador , Morgan
Year: 2007
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

The present paper proposes an original approach to estimate gaseous and particulate emissions from boreal forest fires based on the Canadian Forest Fire Behaviour Prediction ( FBP) System. The FBP System permits calculation of fuel consumption and rate...

Person: Lavoue, Gong, Stocks
Year: 2007
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

In their classic article Allen and Gould (Allen, G.M., and E.M. Gould. 1986. Complexity, wickedness, and public forests. J. For. 84(4):20 -24) stated that the most daunting problems associated with public forest management had a ''wicked...

Person: Carroll, Blatner, Cohn, Morgan
Year: 2007
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

This article examines the growing number of wildfires in the United States. Forest fires are being fueled by deadwood and debris that have been allowed to accumulate by the caretakers of the land. The use of computer modeling is aiding in the...

Person: Andrews, Finney, Fischetti
Year: 2007
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

We investigated the likelihood that short-duration sustained flaming would develop in forest ground fuels that had direct contact with a small and short-lived flame source. Data from 1027 small-scale experimental test fires conducted in field trials at...

Person: Beverly, Wotton
Year: 2007
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the introduction:'This Technical Note is an attempt to summarize what has been done in a number of areas of the world to provide adequate forecasts of fire danger in terms of past, present and forecast weather conditions. It is not intended...

Person:
Year: 1961
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

The Manual includes information on the organization's standard operating procedures, requirements, and guidelines regarding fire management. It also outlines the necessary steps for developing and maintaining a succesful fire management program....

Person: Seamon
Year: 2007
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

The Ventilation Climate Information System (VCIS) provides a web interface to a twice-daily, 40-year database of wind speed, mixing height and ventilation index for the United States at a spatial resolution of approximately 5km (Ferguson et al. 2003)....

Person: Ferguson, Hoadley, Larkin
Year: 2007
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Fire risk and carbon storage are related environmental issues because fire reduction results in carbon storage through the buildup of woody vegetation, and stored carbon is a fuel for fires. The sustainability of the U.S. carbon sink and the extent of...

Person: Girod, Hurtt, Frolking, Aber, King
Year: 2007
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES