Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Displaying 81 - 90 of 168

Recently, Fosberg and Fujioka (1987) emphasized the potential importance that accurate long-range weather forecasts would have on national and regional land and fire management. In particular, they described a national research plan to integrate...

Person: Roads, Ueyoshi, Alpert, Fujioka
Year: 1994
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Representative soundings from 74 major wildland fires in the United States were analyzed to determine if characteristic temperature, moisture, and wind patterns were discernable prior to the occurrence of extreme fire behavior. In a previous study, OO...

Person: Brotak
Year: 1994
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

The National Weather Service (NWS) has provided on-site forecasting services during wildland fire incidents for about 60 years. The basic design of mobile fire weather support units evolved slowly until recently. Prior to the mid 1980's, a vehicle...

Person: Graham
Year: 1994
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Rainfall is one of the most important of the weather parameters on which fire-danger calculations are based. Therefore, a fire weather network which has been optimally designed for measurement of daily rainfall will be adequate for other input...

Person: Kierstead, Dickison, DeMille
Year: 1994
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

This paper describes a system for preparing monthly outlooks for fire-weather elements in the United States. The system is based on multiple regression equations that specify monthly mean anomalies of precipitation, temperature, dewpoint, and wind...

Person: Klein, Whistler
Year: 1994
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

A 30-day fire weather forecast system predicts the monthly mean afternoon temperature, dew point, and wind speed at the 127 National Weather Service (NWS) stations across the United States. The forecast afternoon monthly mean temperature and dew point...

Person: McCutchan, Chow
Year: 1994
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

The United States Historical Climatology Network (HCN) database was compiled by the National Climatic Data Center in response to a compelling interest in climate change. The database contains monthly temperature and precipitation data for approxiamtely...

Person: Meisner, Fujioka
Year: 1994
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Large, free-burning fires do not burn steadily. As most experienced fire personnel know, fire behavior varies significantly with time. It frequently can be described as pulsating. This pulsing is caused by a process called layer-replacement. As the...

Person: Palmer, Goodale, Martin
Year: 1994
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Each year lightning ignites approximately 10,000 wildland fires in the United States alone. Therefore, when considering how climate change may affect wildland fires, one needs to consider possible changes in lightning activity. With the aid of...

Person: Price, Rind
Year: 1994
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

A two-dimensional, coupled, earth-atmospheric model has been used to simulate mean and turbulent atmospheric conditions near lines of extreme surface heating. Prognostic equations are used to solve for the horizontal and vertical wind components,...

Person: Heilman, Fast
Year: 1994
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS