Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Person: Sun
Year: 2005
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Created through the Wildfire Disaster Recovery Act of 1989 (PL 101-286), in response to the destructive western fire season of 1987 and the Yellowstone fires of 1988, the Commission was asked to consider the environmental and economic effects of...

Person:
Year: 1994
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Data from three separate but related surveys address the linkages between recreation and public perception of attitudes toward fire management. Recreation ranks high among alternative forest resource uses and is a serious concern vis-a-vis fire effects...

Person: Taylor, Cortner, Gardner, Daniel, Zwolinski, Carpenter
Year: 1986
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

A new Forest Service policy, effective February 1978, allows some wildfires to burn under prescribed conditions, urges a multidisciplinary approach to fire control, and has applications to rural and urban situations.

Person: Davis
Year: 1979
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

The risks, uncertainties, and social conflicts surrounding uncharacteristic wildfire and forest resource values have defied conventional approaches to planning and decision-making. Paradoxically, the adoption of technological innovations such as risk...

Person: Borchers
Year: 2005
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

Organizations managing forest land often make fire management decisions that seem overly risk-averse in relation to their stated goals for ecosystem restoration, protection of sensitive species and habitats, and protection of water and timber resources...

Person: Maguire, Albright
Year: 2005
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

Forest-fire policy of U.S. federal agencies has evolved from the use of small patrols in newly created National Parks to diverse policy initiatives and institutional arrangements that affect millions of hectares of forests. Even with large expenditures...

Person: Stephens, Ruth
Year: 2005
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

The dramatic expansion into the Wildland-Urban Interface (WUI) places property, natural assets, and human life at risk from wildfire destruction. The U.S. National Fire Plan encourages communities to implement laws and outreach programs for pre-fire...

Person: Reams, Haines, Renner, Wascom, Kingre
Year: 2005
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

Construction of fuelbreaks as a presuppression fuels treatment strategy in national forests has always been controversial (Omi 1996). Criticisms have been raised over the objectives, prescriptions, locations, methods, costs, impacts, and effectiveness...

Person: Ingalsbee
Year: 2005
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

To determine the optimal suppression strategy for escaped wildfires, federal land managers are required to conduct a wildland fire situation analysis (WFSA). As part of the WFSA process, fire managers estimate final fire size and suppression costs....

Person: Donovan, Noordijk
Year: 2005
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS