Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Displaying 1 - 10 of 13

The increasing incidence, extent and severity of uncontrolled burning globally, together with its many adverse consequences, has brought fire into the international environmental policy arena, with growing calls for international action leading to...

Person: Goldammer
Year: 2003
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Modern fire suppression has the potential to alter the natural distribution of forest cover types and age classes, which has consequences for resource management. A 21,000 ha prescribed burn to enhance wildlife habitat and secondarily reduce continuity...

Person: Paragi, Smart, Worum, Haggstrom
Year: 2003
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Of the thousands of fires that occur each year on publicly managed lands, the vast majority are suppressed by initial actions undertaken by the local administrative unit. However, on relatively rare occasions fires become exceptionally large and can...

Person: MacGregor, Gonzalez-Caban
Year: 2003
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

This talk describes development of a physics-based mathematical and computational model to predict fire spread among structures and natural fuels (trees, shrubs and ground litter). This tool will be used to understand how fires spread in a community...

Person: Rehm, Evans, McGrattan, Forney, Bouldin, Baker, Mell, Hostikka
Year: 2003
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Over the past 15 years meteorological satellites have been increasingly used for land surface applications, including fire detection and monitoring. Several automated algorithms now provide satellite derived fire products in near real time for hazards...

Person: Feltz, Moreau, Prins, Claid-Cook, Brown
Year: 2003
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Since August of 2000 the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) have been used to detect and monitor biomass burning in the Western Hemisphere on a half-hourly basis using the...

Person: Schmidt, Prins
Year: 2003
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

[no description entered]

Person: Rhoades
Year: 1994
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Over the past four years scientists have cooperatively monitored fire behavior and smoke chemistry, on a number of large prescribed fires in the Province of Ontario. Primary cooperating agencies include Forestry Canada, the United States Forest Service...

Person: Stocks, McRae
Year: 1994
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Determining the specific mix of fire-fighting resources for a given fire is a necessary condition for identifying the minimum of the Cost Plus Net Value Change (C+NVC) function. Current wildland fire management models may not reliably do so. The...

Person: Donovan, Rideout
Year: 2003
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

This FIRESTAT User's Guide shows you how to enter Individual Fire Report information using form FS-5100-29 and other sources. It is organized to help you locate and perform specific FIRESTAT functions quickly and easily.

Person:
Year: 2003
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES