Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Displaying 1 - 10 of 62

The area burned in the North American boreal forest is controlled by the frequency of mid-tropospheric blocking highs that cause rapid fuel drying. Climate controls the area burned through changing the dynamics of large-scale teleconnection patterns (...

Person: Fauria, Johnson
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Climate change, increased wildland fuels, and residential development patterns in fire-prone areas all combine to make wildfire risk mitigation an important public policy issue. One approach to wildfire risk mitigation is to encourage homeowners to use...

Person: Butry, Donovan
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the text ... 'Fire Management Today received 285 images from 69 people for our 2007 photo contest.'

Person:
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the text ... 'How to improve the safety of wildland firefighters has always been a concern of Saskatchewan Fire Management and Forest Protection Branch (FMFP), the provincial agency responsible for the management of wildland fires. Even...

Person: Emmett
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Management around wilderness parks ideally requires thorough fire suppression in proximate settled and commercially exploited lands and natural fire within protected areas. To satisfy these requirements, we explored a potential regional firebreak (...

Person: Suffling, Grant, Feick
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

We describe the development of a statistical model of spatial variation in the area burned by lightning-caused forest fires across the province of Ontario. We partitioned Ontario's fire region into 35 compartments, each of which is relatively...

Person: Martell, Sun
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Aim To identify the influence of interannual and interdecadal climate variation on the occurrence and extent of fires in montane conifer forests of north-western Mexico.Location This study was conducted in Jeffrey pine (Pinus jeffreyi Grev. & Balf...

Person: Skinner, Burk, Barbour, Franco-Vizcaino, Stephens
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Provincial forest management agencies across Canada are attempting to recover suppression costs plus losses to real property due to human-caused fires when negligence is involved. These agencies are responsible for investigating these fires, and they...

Person: Woodard
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

The cumulative impacts of human and natural activity on forest landscapes in Alberta are clear. Human activity, such as forestry and oil and gas development, and natural processes such as wildfire leave distinctive marks on the composition, age class...

Person: Yamasaki, Duchesneau, Doyon, Russell, Gooding
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Patterns of fire occurrence within the Las Bayas Forestry Reserve, Mexico are analyzed in relation to variability in climate, topography, and human land-use. Significantly more fires with shorter fire return intervals occurred from 1900 to 1950 than...

Person: Drury, Veblen
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS