Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Displaying 1 - 8 of 8

Many natural resource agencies and organizations recognize the importance of fuel treatments as tools for reducing fire hazards and restoring ecosystems. However, there continues to be confusion and misconception about fuel treatments and their...

Person: Reinhardt, Keane, Calkin, Cohen
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Summary (p.499-500) ... 'Fire is an important natural and anthropogenic factor in the dynamics of the boreal forest system. The ecological and environmental impacts of boreal fires depend on fire weather, fuel availability, fire behavior and...

Person: Angelstam
Year: 1994
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

[no description entered]

Person: Latham
Year: 1994
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

[no description entered]

Person: McRae, Weirich, Johnson
Year: 1994
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

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Person: Qu, Omi
Year: 1994
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the text:'This paper desribes two generalized decision models that partically characterize decision processes for the evaluation and execution of prescribed fires. Although the two models do not incorporate all the factors managers must...

Person: Radloff, Yancik
Year: 1983
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

It is possible to delimit the areas of the North, Central, and South America that are most susceptible to fire and would have been most affected by burning practices of early Americans. Areas amounting to approximately 155 x 105 km² are here designated...

Person: Woodcock, Wells
Year: 1994
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

[no description entered]

Person: Brandel, Omi
Year: 1983
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS