Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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The Firewise USA™ national recognition program evolved from a 1986 cooperative agreement between the Forest Service and the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA). The agreement enabled NFPA, as a national nonprofit safety organization with an...

Person: Prudhomme
Year: 2018
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

For the last 100 years, fire suppression policies have largely kept fire from playing its natural role. Removing fire from ecosystems that depend on it to stay healthy, coupled with more people building houses in flammable natural areas, has created a...

Person: Medley-Daniel
Year: 2018
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Wildfire mitigation can improve the chances of a home surviving a wildfire. Research has shown that one of the most important sources of information that prompts residents in the wildland-urban interface (WUI) to take action to reduce their wildfire...

Person: Shirley
Year: 2018
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

The socio-environmental dimension in wildland fire management is critical for moving towards a baseline of firewise planning. Wildland fire risk planning is a land use planning tool that should be able to keep pace with rapid rates of social and...

Person: Gallego, Bach, Molina-Terrén
Year: 2018
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Each year, the wildfire season in the Western United States brings headlines and news reports, mostly factual but sometimes misleading. This year is no different, a case in point being 'Let Forest Fires Burn? What the Black-Backed Woodpecker Knows' (...

Person: Tidwell
Year: 2018
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

The Wildland Urban Interface or WUI is used throughout the fire world as a designation for where to focus pre-fire risk mitigation and active fire tactics. The WUI is composed of interface WUI, where buildings and vegetation meet, and intermix WUI,...

Person: Kramer, Frederick
Year: 2018
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Discusses how to manage landscapes for fire when areas are owned or managed by different people or entities. One in a series of fire FAQs that are based on questions that Forest & Natural Resource Extension agents and specialists have received from...

Person: Baylog, Leavell, Berger
Year: 2018
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

This reference work encompasses the current, accepted state of the art in the science of wildfires and wildfires that spread to communities, known as wildland-urban interface (WUI) fires. More than 300 author contributions include accepted knowledge on...

Person: Manzello
Year: 2018
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Wildland fire is the dominant disturbance agent of the boreal forest of Alaska. Currently, about 80% of the population of Alaska resides in communities potentially at risk from wildland fire. The wildland fire threat to these settlements is increasing...

Person: Little, Jandt, Drury, Molina, Lane
Year: 2018
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

This planning framework and the accompanying planning systems audit tool are designed for use by planners working in or with communities located in the wildland-urban interface (WUI). The framework provides a menu of planning tools that communities can...

Person:
Year: 2018
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES