Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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From the text ... 'Project Learning Tree coordinators provide information and activities to make teachers feel comfortable teaching about wildland fire issues. Fire education workshops, lasting from 9 hours to a full week, cover topics such as the...

Person: Owens
Year: 2009
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

The National Weather Service Fire Weather Program provides weather forecasting and meteorological support services to state and federal wildland fire management agencies. An Intergovernmental Fire Weather User's Summit, sponsored by the National...

Person:
Year: 1994
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Created through the Wildfire Disaster Recovery Act of 1989 (PL 101-286), in response to the destructive western fire season of 1987 and the Yellowstone fires of 1988, the Commission was asked to consider the environmental and economic effects of...

Person:
Year: 1994
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

'Smokey Bear, America's 'forest fire preventin' bear' for fifty years, has taken a lot of undeserved heat lately. Wildland fire management professionals--especially fire prevention professionals--must understand that heat and...

Person: Joslin
Year: 1994
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Over the last 20 years, the duties of US fire professionals have become more complex and risk laden because of fuel load accumulation, climate change, and the increasing wildland-urban interface. Incorporation of fire use and ecological principles into...

Person: Kobziar, Rocca, Dicus, Hoffman, Sugihara, Thode, Varner, Morgan
Year: 2009
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

The 2003 Healthy Forests Restoration Act calls for local communities in the wildland-urban interface to collaborate on developing Community Wildfire Protection Plans to reduce their wildfire hazard. To craft a successful CWPP, a community must...

Person:
Year: 2009
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

An important component of the wildland fire problem in the United States is the growing number of people living in high fire hazard areas. How people in these areas contribute to fire risk-or potentially decrease it-will be shaped by their attitudes...

Person: McCaffrey
Year: 2009
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

The Harvest Cost-Revenue Estimator, a financial model, was used to examine the cost sensitivity of forest biomass harvesting scenarios to targeted policies designed to stimulate wildfire hazardous fuel reduction projects. The policies selected...

Person: Becker, Larson, Lowell
Year: 2009
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

Firewise Alaska is a reference guide developed by the Alaska Wildland Fire Coordinating Group. Homeowners can take effective measures to protect their homes and property. Adopting Firewise principles can reduce your risk of damage or loss to your...

Person: Rodman
Year: 2009
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

The National Park Service in Alaska has several hazardous fuels projects that are being monitored for successional changes and potential fuel break effectiveness. Lessons learned from these projects are discussed in this presentation.

Person: Barnes
Year: 2009
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES