Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

Filter Results

Displaying 1 - 10 of 11

From the text ... 'The research revealed a painful truth -- we often talk to people about fire using words they don't understand.'

Person: Hibbard, Morris
Year: 2009
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the text ... 'Project Learning Tree coordinators provide information and activities to make teachers feel comfortable teaching about wildland fire issues. Fire education workshops, lasting from 9 hours to a full week, cover topics such as the...

Person: Owens
Year: 2009
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

The National Weather Service Fire Weather Program provides weather forecasting and meteorological support services to state and federal wildland fire management agencies. An Intergovernmental Fire Weather User's Summit, sponsored by the National...

Person:
Year: 1994
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

'Smokey Bear, America's 'forest fire preventin' bear' for fifty years, has taken a lot of undeserved heat lately. Wildland fire management professionals--especially fire prevention professionals--must understand that heat and...

Person: Joslin
Year: 1994
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Wildfires are a serious problem affecting many terrestrial ecosystems and causing substantial economic damage. Understanding the variation in structure of fuels (which are predominantly represented by plant litter and live vegetation) is key to...

Person: Krivtsov, Vigy, Legg, Curt, Rigolot, Lecomte, Jappiot, Lampin-Maillet, Fernandes, Pezzatti
Year: 2009
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

The interaction between smoke and air pollution creates a public health challenge. Fuels treatments proposed for National Forests are intended to reduce fuel accumulations and wildfire frequency and severity, as well as to protect property located in...

Person: Bytnerowicz, Arbaugh, Andersen, Riebau
Year: 2009
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

This paper traces the origin and evolution of the application of nonmarket valuation techniques to fire management within the USDA Forest Service. The motivation for contingent valuation (CVM) studies that quantify existence value is traced to the need...

Person: González-Cabán, Loomis, González-Cabán
Year: 2009
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

An important component of the wildland fire problem in the United States is the growing number of people living in high fire hazard areas. How people in these areas contribute to fire risk-or potentially decrease it-will be shaped by their attitudes...

Person: McCaffrey
Year: 2009
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

The results of this synthesis illustrate several important lessons. First, current forest structure is the result of decades of fire-suppression activities, and so restoration will require multiple treatments to bring forests to within the range of...

Person: Bartuszevige, Kennedy
Year: 2009
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

With the advent of LANDFIRE fuels layers, an increasing number of specialists are using the data in a variety of fire modeling systems. However, a comprehensive guide on acquiring, critiquing, and editing (ACE) geospatial fuels data does not exist....

Person: Stratton
Year: 2009
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS