Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Displaying 1 - 10 of 11

After wildfire, land managers are often called on to undertake complex restoration activities while also managing relations with wildfire-devastated communities. This research investigates the community-US Forest Service agency relations in the...

Person: Ryan, Hamin
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

With evidence of increasing wildfire risks in wildland-urban interface zones in the U.S. West and elsewhere, understanding intended evacuation behavior is a growing issue for community planners. This research investigates intended evacuation behavior...

Person: Mozumder, Raheem, Talberth, Berrens
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

The National Weather Service Fire Weather Program provides weather forecasting and meteorological support services to state and federal wildland fire management agencies. An Intergovernmental Fire Weather User's Summit, sponsored by the National...

Person:
Year: 1994
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Created through the Wildfire Disaster Recovery Act of 1989 (PL 101-286), in response to the destructive western fire season of 1987 and the Yellowstone fires of 1988, the Commission was asked to consider the environmental and economic effects of...

Person:
Year: 1994
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Large wildland fires are complex, costly events influenced by a vast array of physical, climatic, and social factors. Changing climate, fuel buildup due to past suppression, and increasing populations in the wildland-urban interface have all been...

Person: Canton-Thompson, Gebert, Thompson, Jones, Calkin, Donovan
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

The recent evolution of the rural and urban areas has led to the progressive emergence of a complex and multiform wildland urban interface. Today this interface has turned into a fire threat which is omnipresent. The evolution in progress raises in...

Person: Paegelow, Camacho Olmedo, Galtie
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Recent years have brought dramatic expansion of residential development into the Wildland-Urban-Interface (WUI). This rapid development places property, natural assets and human life at risk from wildfire destruction. The U.S. National Fire Plan...

Person: González-Cabán, Reams, Haines, Renner
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

The fire destruction of hundreds of homes associated with wildfires has occurred in the United States for more than a century. From 1870 to 1920, massive wildfires occurred principally in the Lake States but also elsewhere. Wildfires such as Peshtigo (...

Person: Cohen
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Though fuel specialists, scientists and managers have developed treatment tools to reduce fuel hazards, such as mechanical thinning by removing trees, costs to treat lands at risk can be prohibitively high. Harvesting timber and woody materials that...

Person: Prestemon, Abt
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

The Municipality of Anchorage Community Wildfire Protection Plan is a collaborative effort in response to the 2003 Healthy Forests Restoration Act (HFRA). The HFRA directs communities exposed to wildland fire to conduct a risk assessment and create a...

Person: Rodman, Stam
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES