Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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This report was designed to meet three broad goals: (1) evaluate wildfire hazard on Federal lands; (2) develop information useful in prioritizing where fuels treatments and mitigation measures might be proposed to address significant fire hazard and...

Person: Calkin, Ager, Gilbertson-Day, Calkin, Ager, Gilbertson-Day, Scott, Finney, Schrader-Patton, Quigley, Strittholt, Kaiden
Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the text ... 'Computer-driven prediction models of post-fire soil erosion can aid site prioritization for erosion control measures....... Fire and site characterization by fire crews during suppression efforts could provide information to...

Person: Godson, Stednick
Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the text ... 'It may be that a new dialogue is needed between those who advocate education and social sciences investigations on fire and those who advocate air quality and health science concerned with fire smoke.'

Person: Riebau, Fox
Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the text ... 'One way to protect the WUI is to restore surrounding landscapes to a healthy, resilient condition. Healthy, resilient forest ecosystems are less likely to see uncharacteristically severe wildfires that turn into human and...

Person: Tidwell, Brown
Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the text (p. 34) ... 'Given the fact that climate change will cause many wildfires to burn larger and longer, the real issue in the near future will not be cost reduction or even cost containment, but rather, cost management. Expenditures may...

Person: Ingalsbee
Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Mechanical and fire treatments are commonly used to reduce fuels where land use practices have encouraged accumulation of woody debris and high densities of trees. Treatments focus on restoration of vegetation structure, but will also affect wildlife...

Person: Bagne, Finch
Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

This paper gives an overview of fire in the wildland-urban interface.

Person: Weise, Wotton
Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

Wildfires that spread into wildland-urban interface (WUI) communities present significant challenges on several fronts. In the United States, the WUI accounts for a significant portion of wildland fire suppression and wildland fuel treatment costs....

Person: Mell, Manzello, Maranghides, Butry, Rehm
Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

Fuel management for wildfire protection is becoming increasingly common in the wildland-urban interface and may have conservation implications for species with restricted distributions and limited dispersal abilities. To evaluate the impact of forest...

Person: Kortello, Ham
Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Wildfire, like many natural hazards, affects large landscapes with many landowners and the risk individual owners face depends on both individual and collective protective actions. In this study, we develop a spatially explicit game theoretic model to...

Person: Busby, Albers
Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS