Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Our mission is to connect and support people and communities who are striving to live more safely with wildfire. The Network is a catalyst for spreading best practices and innovations in fire adaptation concepts nationwide. The purpose of FAC Net is to...

Person:
Year: 2013
Resource Group: Website
Source: FRAMES

Wildfire hazard is a growing threat to communities around the United States. In 2011, the National Interagency Fire Center reported nearly 75,000 wildfires in the U.S., the majority of which were a result of human activities. Preferences for second...

Person:
Year: 2013
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Wildfire management in the wildland-urban interface (WUI) protects property and life from wildland fire. One approach that has potential to provide information about the amount and location of fuels to forest managers and, at the same time, increase...

Person: Ferster, Coops, Harshaw, Kozak, Meitner
Year: 2013
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Climate warming is causing the frequency, extent, and severity of natural disturbances to increase. To develop innovative approaches for mitigating the potential negative social consequences of such increases, research is needed investigating how...

Person: Hansen, Naughton
Year: 2013
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

The wildland-urban interface (WUI) is the region where development meets and intermingles with wildlands. The WUI has an elevated fire risk due to the proximity of development and residents to wildlands with natural wildfire regimes. Existing methods...

Person: Whitman, Rapaport, Sherren
Year: 2013
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

The wildland urban interface (WUI) delineates the areas where wildland fire hazard most directly impacts human communities and threatens lives and property, and where houses exert the strongest influence on the natural environment. Housing data are a...

Person: Bar-Massada, Stewart, Hammer, Mockrin, Radeloff
Year: 2013
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Despite a broad literature addressing the human dimensions of wildfire, current approaches often compartmentalize results according to disciplinary boundaries. Further, relatively few studies have focused on the public's evolving perceptions of...

Person: Gordon, Gruver, Flint, Luloff
Year: 2013
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the Introduction ... 'Wildfires generally are getting larger and causing more damage. The past decade has seen the six worst fire seasons of the past half-century....Wildfire protection is also getting more costly. Bigger fires cost more to...

Person: Gorte
Year: 2013
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

National-scale analyses of fire occurrence are needed to prioritize fire policy and management activities across the United States. However, the drivers of national-scale patterns of fire occurrence are not well understood, and how the relative...

Person: Hawbaker, Radeloff, Stewart, Hammer, Keuler, Clayton
Year: 2013
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

In this article, we consider wildfire risk management decisions using a dynamic stochastic model of homeowner interaction in a setting where spatial externalities arise. Our central objective is to apply observations from the social science literature...

Person: Busby, Amacher, Haight
Year: 2013
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS