Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Displaying 1 - 10 of 38

From the text ... 'Because fire was such an important historic disturbance and is a large component in understanding regional differences in emissions, it is analogous to an elephant in the closet. One can think of fire frequency as the elephant....

Person: Robertson, Galley, Masters, Guyette
Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

The report synthesizes the literature and current state of knowledge pertaining to reintroducing fire in stands where it has been excluded for long periods and the impact of these introductory fires on overstory tree injury and mortality. Only forested...

Person: Hood
Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

We analyze detailed atmospheric gas/aerosol composition data acquired during the 2008 NASA ARCTAS (Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites) airborne campaign performed at high northern latitudes in spring (...

Person: Singh, Anderson, Brune, Cai, Cohen, Crawford, Cubison, Czech, Emmons, Fuelberg, Huey, Jacob, Jimenez, Kaduwela, Kondo, Mao, Olson, Sachse, Vay, Weinheimer, Wennberg, Wisthaler
Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Aim The spruce-moss forest is the main forest ecosystem of the North American boreal forest. We used stand structure and fire data to examine the long-term development and growth of the spruce-moss ecosystem. We evaluate the stability of the forest...

Person: Pollock, Payette
Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

In the North American boreal forest, the adoption of forest ecosystem management strategies usually increases the number of forest stands to be treated with irregular or uneven-aged silvicultural systems. However, it is difficult to properly target the...

Person: Cote, Bouchard, Pothier, Gauthier
Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Descriptions of spatial patterns are important components of forest ecosystems, providing insights into functions and processes, yet basic spatial relationships between forest structures and fuels remain largely unexplored. We used standardized...

Person: Fry, Stephens
Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Shrub encroachment in arid and semiarid rangelands, a worldwide phenomenon, results in a heterogeneous landscape characterized by a mosaic of nutrient-depleted barren soil bordered by nutrient-enriched shrubby areas known as ''fertile islands...

Person: Ravi, D'Odorico, Huxman, Collins
Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Boreal forests are an important source of wood products, and fertilizers could be used to improve forest yields, especially in nutrient poor regions of the boreal zone. With climate change, fire frequencies may increase, resulting in a larger fraction...

Person: Allison, Gartner, Mack, McGuire, Treseder
Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

The differences between boreal forest landscapes produced by natural disturbance regimes and landscapes produced by harvesting are important and increasingly well documented. To continue harvesting operations while maintaining biodiversity and other...

Person: Cyr, Gauthier, Etheridge, Kayahara, Bergeron
Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

In land change science studies, a cover type is defined by land surface attributes, specifically including the types of vegetation, topography and human structures, which makes it difficult to characterize land cover as discrete classes. One of the...

Person: Schneider, Fernando
Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS