Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Displaying 1 - 10 of 42

Solutions to the wildland-urban interface or intermix (WUI) fire problem may vary considerably across ecosystems. A case in point is the boreal forest regions of northern Canada and Alaska - i.e., 'northern solutions are needed for northern problems'....

Person: Alexander
Year: 2009
Resource Group: Media
Source: FRAMES

The retrieval of Live Fuel Moisture Content (LFMC) over fire prone grasslands is important for fire risk and drought assessment. Radiative transfer (RT) model based inversion of measured reflectances for retrievals of LFMC offers a promising method for...

Person: Dasgupta, Qu, Bhoi
Year: 2009
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the text ... 'The Joint Fire Science Program, the National Wildfire Coordinating Group Fuels Management Committee, and Sonoma Technology, Inc. are unveiling the prototype of a new planning environment that will help fuels specialists...

Person: Wells
Year: 2009
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

We used the TELSA forest landscape model to examine the long-term consequences of applying different forest management scenarios on indicators of wildlife habitat, understory productivity, crown fuel hazard, timber yield and treatment costs. The study...

Person: Klenner, Walton
Year: 2009
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the text ... 'Removing hazardous fuels to reduce the risk of wildfire has become a priority for land managers across the United States. Utilizing biomass taken from forests to cover the cost of fuel reduction is an attractive ideal. Effective...

Person: Wells
Year: 2009
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Strategic modification of forest vegetation has become increasingly popular as one of the few preemptive activities that land managers can undertake to reduce the likelihood that an area will be burned by a wildfire. Directed use of prescribed fire or...

Person: Beverly, Herd, Conner
Year: 2009
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

LANDFIRE is a 5-year, multipartner project producing consistent and comprehensive maps and data describing vegetation, wildland fuel, fire regimes and ecological departure from historical conditions across the United States. It is a shared project...

Person: Rollins
Year: 2009
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Despite widespread efforts to avert wildfire by reducing the density of flammable vegetation, little is known about the effects of this practice on the reproductive biology of forest birds. We examined nest-site selection and nest survival of the Black...

Person: Smith, Finch, Hawksworth
Year: 2009
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

The interaction between disturbance and climate change and resultant effects on ecosystem carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) fluxes are poorly understood. Here, we model (using CENTURY version 4.5) how climate change may affect C and N fluxes among mature and...

Person: Smithwick, Ryan, Kashian, Romme, Tinker, Turner
Year: 2009
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Boreal forest soils represent a considerable reservoir of carbon on a global basis. The objective of this study was to compare the response of soil organic carbon (OC) to disturbance along two jack pine (Pinus banksiana Lamb.) chronosequences of either...

Person: Norris, Quideau, Bhatti, Wasylishen, MacKenzie
Year: 2009
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS