Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Displaying 71 - 80 of 330

It is possible to delimit the areas of the North, Central, and South America that are most susceptible to fire and would have been most affected by burning practices of early Americans. Areas amounting to approximately 155 x 105 km² are here designated...

Person: Woodcock, Wells
Year: 1994
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the text: 'Authorities pinpoint certain western forests so stressed and vulnerable that catastrophic fires threaten this summer. With over 10 million acres of forest showing serious stress in the West, wildfire is an enormous concern...

Person: Sampson
Year: 1994
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

During 1991-1994 we tested whether martens (Martes americana) selectively used postfire seres in the Alaskan taiga and whether selection could be explained by differences in marten hunting behaviour, habitat, prey abundance, or demography. Forest seral...

Person: Paragi, Johnson, Katnik, Magoun
Year: 1996
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

This article explores the evidence for monoterpenes to alter rates of nutrient cycling, with particular emphasis on the nitrogen (N) cycle, from an ecosystem perspective. The general N cycle is reviewed and particular processes are noted where...

Person: White
Year: 1994
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Multivariate analysis was used to describe the composition and distribution of vegetation types on the slopes of the volcanoes Tláloc and Pelado, Mexico. These volcanoes are situated in the transitional zone between the Holarctic and Neotropical...

Person: Velázquez
Year: 1994
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

The National Weather Service Fire Weather Program provides weather forecasting and meteorological support services to state and federal wildland fire management agencies. An Intergovernmental Fire Weather User's Summit, sponsored by the National...

Person:
Year: 1994
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Most grasslands have developed under burning, and the dominant grasses are tolerant of burning (Roberts 1979; Hodgkinson 1986). Roberts (1979) suggested that burning provided advantages to grasses over desirable pasture legumes, whereas Pressland (1982...

Person: Pitman, Adjei
Year: 1994
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Natural Pinus resinosa (red pine) stands in Newfoundland are restricted to 22 small, dry, nutrient-poor sites. A short wildfire cycle (15 - 30 yr) of both surface and crown fire regulates stand perimeters and is the main factor in regulating stand...

Person: Roberts, Mallik
Year: 1994
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

The desert/grassland biome transition zone in central New Mexico provides an important region for testing species differences to changing environmental conditions and various land management practices. Interactions of black grama (Bouteloua eripoda)...

Person: Gosz, Gosz
Year: 1996
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Managing forests for sustainable use requires that both the biological diversity of the forests and a viable forest industry be maintained. A current approach towards maintaining biological diversity is to pattern forest management practices after...

Person: Delong, Tanner
Year: 1996
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS