Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Person: Ffolliott, DeBano, Baker, Gottfried, Solis-Garza, Edminster, Neary, Hamre, Daniel, Meitner, Weidemann
Year: 1996
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the Introduction...'Several decades of fire suppression following logging around the turn-of-the-century has produced dense, even-age stands of ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) and Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii). They contrast with the...

Person: Hardy, Arno, Scott
Year: 1996
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the Introduction...'Fire is the single most important ecological disturbance process throughout the interior Pacific Northwest (Mutch and others 1993; Agee 1994). It is also a natural process that helps maintain a diverse ecological landscape...

Person: Hardy, Arno, Ottmar, Schaaf, Alvarado
Year: 1996
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Created through the Wildfire Disaster Recovery Act of 1989 (PL 101-286), in response to the destructive western fire season of 1987 and the Yellowstone fires of 1988, the Commission was asked to consider the environmental and economic effects of...

Person:
Year: 1994
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

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Person: Pyne
Year: 1994
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

There are four major questions affecting the future of ecological restoration. The first and most serious question is philosophical. Should we attempt to restore ecosystems? Some people want to separate humans from nature because they believe that...

Person: Covington, DeBano, Bonnicksen
Year: 1994
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

While natural areas are generally perceived as desirable havens by city dwellers, the potential danger of fire is not always fully appreciated. People may correctly perceive the risk, but are unwilling to compromise their version of natural and...

Person: Ffolliott, DeBano, Baker, Gottfried, Solis-Garza, Edminster, Neary, Allen, Hamre, Daniel, Meitner, Weidemann
Year: 1996
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Stand replacement prescribed burning has been applied in Alaska on several occasions. Based on that experience, perspectives can be provided, issues can be discussed, and keys to success can be identified that are applicable to stand replacement...

Person: Hardy, Arno, Vanderlinden
Year: 1996
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

This paper's title - "Can we restore the fire process? What awaits us if we don't?" - represents an ecologist's view of the world. I submit that this view is unrealistic. The first clause uses the term "restore" which...

Person: Hardy, Arno, Schmidt
Year: 1996
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

In a world blessed and burdened with complexity, the ecology of fire stands out-partly because of its inherent drama and anthropological connections, partly because of its urgency to conservationists and land managers. This book aims to summarize and...

Person: Smith
Year: 1996
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES