Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Displaying 1 - 10 of 79

Like many before it, the wildfire was conceived on a late summer afternoon as a drifting monsoonal cell bunched up, gathered its energy, and raked over the mountainous uplift, all the while spewing hard rain, wind, and lightning. The neighborhood it...

Person: Fillmore
Year: 2018
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

The Firewise USA™ national recognition program evolved from a 1986 cooperative agreement between the Forest Service and the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA). The agreement enabled NFPA, as a national nonprofit safety organization with an...

Person: Prudhomme
Year: 2018
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

For the last 100 years, fire suppression policies have largely kept fire from playing its natural role. Removing fire from ecosystems that depend on it to stay healthy, coupled with more people building houses in flammable natural areas, has created a...

Person: Medley-Daniel
Year: 2018
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Wildfire mitigation can improve the chances of a home surviving a wildfire. Research has shown that one of the most important sources of information that prompts residents in the wildland-urban interface (WUI) to take action to reduce their wildfire...

Person: Shirley
Year: 2018
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Imagine this: it’s early morning in fire camp. Crews worked late last night mopping up a prescribed burn on national forest land, and now they’re crawling out of sleeping bags and into their greens and yellows, preparing for another busy day on the...

Person: Bailey, Quinn-Davidson
Year: 2018
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Ever hear the Forest Service called the 'Forest Circus'? Calling something a circus usually paints a picture of disorganization and chaos. The impression is misleading because both the circus and the Forest Service can teach a lot about discipline,...

Person: Greene, Jacques
Year: 2018
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

This Research Brief summarizes findings of a Joint Fire Science Program project focused on understanding radio communications as part of risk communication and sensemaking in wildland fire operations. Through observation of live and simulated radio...

Person: Black, Fox, Gabor, Thomas, Ziegler
Year: 2018
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

This collection of essays-divided into three key categories: Risk, Culture, and Operations-daylights qualities and practices in the wildland fire service across a broad spectrum, from outdated and unwarranted to honorable and profound. We must...

Person:
Year: 2018
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Interagency hotshot crews (IHCs) form the backbone of the Federal Government's response to wildland fre. Their high level of physical ftness, training, self-reliance, and expertise make the IHCs the world's elite wildland frefghters; these men and...

Person: Bramwell
Year: 2018
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

The socio-environmental dimension in wildland fire management is critical for moving towards a baseline of firewise planning. Wildland fire risk planning is a land use planning tool that should be able to keep pace with rapid rates of social and...

Person: Gallego, Bach, Molina-Terrén
Year: 2018
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES