Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Displaying 1 - 10 of 11

From the text... 'One of the potential problems with the use of prescribed burning in the past has been the lack of any systematic investigation into the ecological effects of this forest management practice on the ecosystem. In 1991, the planning...

Person: Weber, Wells
Year: 1994
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Created through the Wildfire Disaster Recovery Act of 1989 (PL 101-286), in response to the destructive western fire season of 1987 and the Yellowstone fires of 1988, the Commission was asked to consider the environmental and economic effects of...

Person:
Year: 1994
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

[no description entered]

Person: Gleason
Year: 1994
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

[no description entered]

Person: Pyne
Year: 1994
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

'Documentation and analysis for fire behavior events should become a standard practice with Fire Behavior Analysts, and not 'a nice to do project'. The FBA has a responsibility bfore leaving a fire to tabulate pertinent data and to write...

Person: Thomas
Year: 1994
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

[no description entered]

Person: Maclean
Year: 1994
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Each year lightning ignites approximately 10,000 wildland fires in the United States alone. Therefore, when considering how climate change may affect wildland fires, one needs to consider possible changes in lightning activity. With the aid of...

Person: Price, Rind
Year: 1994
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

[no description entered]

Person: Kilgore
Year: 1976
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Description not entered.

Person: Ottmar, Vihnanek, Alvarado
Year: 1994
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

An account of a portable system comprising two 6-ft long antennae, a receiver and a plotter which can detect and locate cloud-to-ground lightning strokes within a 200-mile radius. The system worked well in tests in Alaska.

Person: Gillean
Year: 1976
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES