Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Large-scale sell-offs of industrial timberlands in the United States have prompted public and private investments in a new class of ''working forest'' land deals, notable for their large size and complex divisions of property rights...

Person: Neugarten, Wolf, Stedman, Tear
Year: 2011
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Rangeland extent is an important factor for evaluating critical indicators of rangeland sustainability. Rangeland areal extent was determined for the coterminous United States in a geospatial framework by evaluating spatially explicit data from the...

Person: Reeves, Mitchell
Year: 2011
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

We estimated forest area and carbon changes in the conterminous United States using a remote sensing based land cover change map, forest fire data from the Monitoring Trends in Burn Severity program, and forest growth and harvest data from the USDA...

Person: Zheng, Heath, Ducey, Smith
Year: 2011
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

[no description entered]

Person: Rothermel
Year: 1994
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the text... 'One of the potential problems with the use of prescribed burning in the past has been the lack of any systematic investigation into the ecological effects of this forest management practice on the ecosystem. In 1991, the planning...

Person: Weber, Wells
Year: 1994
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Each year lightning ignites approximately 10,000 wildland fires in the United States alone. Therefore, when considering how climate change may affect wildland fires, one needs to consider possible changes in lightning activity. With the aid of...

Person: Price, Rind
Year: 1994
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

An aerostat-borne instrument and sampling method was developed to characterize air samples from area sources, such as emissions from open burning. The 10 kg battery-powered instrument system, termed “the Flyer”, is lofted with a helium-filled aerostat...

Person: Aurell, Gullett, Pressley, Tabor, Gribble
Year: 2011
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of how emissions from wildland fires were calculated and reported in the Environmental Protection Agency‘s (EPA) Inventory of U.S. Greenhouse Gas Emissions And Sinks: 1990 – 2009. All information...

Person: Matthews
Year: 2011
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

This desk guide is a synthesis of accepted methods, practices, and equipment currently used by many agencies across the United States to collect and process fuel moisture samples., This synthesis fulfills four primary goals: (1) Provide a fuel moisture...

Person: Zahn, Henson
Year: 2011
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

The spatial, temporal, and social dimensions of wildfire risk are challenging U.S. federal land management agencies to meet societal needs while maintaining the health of the lands they manage. In this paper we present a quantitative, geospatial...

Person: Thompson, Calkin, Finney, Ager, Gilbertson-Day
Year: 2011
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES