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The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

Displaying 126 - 150 of 14911

Werth
Eyewitness accounts in journals and diaries have documented the relationship between weather and large wildland fire for over a hundred years. Even a hundred years ago, observers recognized short periods of up to several days in every fire season when wildland fuels were…
Year: 2017
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES

Hockenberry
A Red Flag Warning (RFW) is the fundamental fire-weath­er-warning product of the National Weather Service. Various publications and online meeting notes show that RFWs originated in the late 1950s to early 1960s. Early sources defined the RFW as an indication of weather expected…
Year: 2017
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES

Sharples, McRae, Simpson, Fox-Hughes, Clements
The presence of mountains-or even hills-in the path of an airmass can have important effects on the characteristics of the air. Temperature, humidity, wind speed, and wind direction can all vary greatly across complex ter­rain, and the variation of any of these factors will…
Year: 2017
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES

Charney, Potter
Convection and downbursts are connected meteorological phenomena with the potential to affect fire behavior and thereby alter the evolution of a wildland fire. Meteorological phenomena related to convection and down-bursts are often discussed in the context of fire behavior and…
Year: 2017
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES

Heffernan
The role of meteorology in wild-land fire management is varied. It takes an entire interagency team of highly qualified scientists to fill the needs of the wildland fire community. Employees of several Federal agencies, as well as people in the research community, have fire-…
Year: 2017
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES

Cova, Dennison, Drews
Improving community resiliency to wildfire is a challenging problem in the face of ongoing development in fire-prone regions. Evacuation and shelter-in-place are the primary options for reducing wildfire casualties, but it can be difficult to determine which option offers the…
Year: 2011
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES

Wilson, McCaffrey, Toman
Throughout the late 19th century and most of the 20th century, risks associated with wildfire were addressed by suppressing fires as quickly as possible. However, by the 1960s, it became clear that fire exclusion policies were having adverse effects on ecological health, as well…
Year: 2017
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES

Hall, Brunson
Land managers use various methods to reduce fuel levels. The two most common fuel treatment methods include forest thinning and prescribed fire. The pace of implementing such fuel treatments has increased over the last several decades. Scientific studies of fuel treatments…
Year: 2017
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES

McMullen, De Leenheer, Tonkin, Lytle
Disturbances cause high mortality in populations while simultaneously enhancing population growth by improving habitats. These countervailing effects make it difficult to predict population dynamics following disturbance events. To address this challenge, we derived a novel form…
Year: 2017
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES

Cruz, Alexander, Sullivan
Generalised statements about the state of fire science are often used to provide a simplified context for new work. This paper explores the validity of five frequently repeated statements regarding empirical and physical models for predicting wildland fire behaviour. For…
Year: 2017
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES

Beverly
In black spruce forests characterised by high-intensity crown fires, early detection and containment of fires while they are small is crucial for averting progression to fire intensities that exceed suppression capabilities. Fire behaviour conditions encountered during initial…
Year: 2017
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES

Huang, Rein
Smouldering fires in peatland are different from the flames in wildland fires. Smouldering peat fire is slow, low-temperature and more persistent, releasing large amounts of smoke into the atmosphere. In this work, we experimentally and computationally investigate the vertical…
Year: 2017
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES

Kumar, Wu, Huang, Liao, Kaplan
We estimate the global Hg wildfire emissions for the 2000s and the potential impacts from the 2000–2050 changes in climate, land use and land cover and Hg anthropogenic emissions by combining statistical analysis with global data on vegetation type and coverage as well as fire…
Year: 2018
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES

Peterson, Nelson
Vegetation structure, including forest canopy height, is an important input variable to fire behavior modeling systems for simulating wildfire behavior. As such, forest canopy height is one of a nationwide suite of products generated by the LANDFIRE program. In the past,…
Year: 2014
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES

Prato
Applying fuel reduction treatments (FRTs) to forested landscapes can alleviate undesirable changes in wildfire benefits and costs due to climate change. A conceptual framework was developed for determining the preferred FRTs across planning periods, adapting FRTs to future…
Year: 2015
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

Benali, Russo, Sá, Pinto, Price, Koutsias, Pereira
Each wildfire has its own “history”, burns under specific conditions and leads to unique environmental impacts. Information on where and when it has started and its duration is important to improve understanding on the dynamics of individual wildfires. This information is…
Year: 2016
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES

Youssouf, Liousse, Roblou, Assamoi, Salonen, Maesano, Banerjee, Annesi-Maesano
Wildfires take a heavy toll on human health worldwide. Climate change may increase the risk of wildfire frequency. Therefore, in view of adapted preventive actions, there is an urgent need to further understand the health effects and public awareness of wildfires. We conducted a…
Year: 2014
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

Mhawej, Faour, Adjizian-Gerard
Wildfires occur in different climatic zones, forest cover types and eras. Wildfire or forest fire has always shaped the landscape. Different methodologies and indexes have emerged to determine the likelihood of wildfire, commonly confused with the wildfire hazard. However, none…
Year: 2015
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES

Martin, Hillen
In wildfire science, spotting refers to non-local creation of new fires, due to downwind ignition of brands launched from a primary fire. Spotting is often mentioned as being one of the most difficult problems for wildfire management, because of its unpredictable nature. Since…
Year: 2016
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES

Allison, Johnston, Craig, Jennings
For decades detection and monitoring of forest and other wildland fires has relied heavily on aircraft (and satellites). Technical advances and improved affordability of both sensors and sensor platforms promise to revolutionize the way aircraft detect, monitor and help suppress…
Year: 2016
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES

Pyne
I present the case for a fire-centric scholarship, and suggest the transition between burning living landscapes and lithic ones (in the form of fossil fuels) would make a good demonstration of what such scholarship might do and what its value could be.
Year: 2017
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES

Munoz-Alpizar, Pavlovic, Moran, Chen, Gravel, Henderson, Ménard, Racine, Duhamel, Gilbert, Beaulieu, Landry, Davignon, Cousineau, Bouchet
FireWork is an on-line, one-way coupled meteorology–chemistry model based on near-real-time wildfire emissions. It was developed by Environment and Climate Change Canada to deliver operational real-time forecasts of biomass-burning pollutants, in particular fine particulate…
Year: 2017
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES

Dannenberg, Wise
Much of the precipitation delivered to western North America arrives during the cool season via midlatitude Pacific storm tracks, which may experience future shifts in response to climate change. Here, we assess the sensitivity of the hydroclimate and ecosystems of western North…
Year: 2017
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES

Perera, Buse
Large and intense wildfires are integral to the globally important boreal forest biome. While much is known about boreal wildfires, the focus on forest remnants that either escape or survive these intense fires is a recent phenomenon: academics now study ecological processes of…
Year: 2014
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES

Minor, Boyce
Wildfire prevention advertisements featuring Smokey Bear represent the longest-standing and most successful government advertising and branding campaign in U.S. history. As the public face of U.S. fire control policy, Smokey Bear uses mass media to influence the attitudes and…
Year: 2018
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES