Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Displaying 21 - 30 of 140

Resource management plans and objectives may be sound ecologically and within agency mandates for management, but impossible to expedite because of political considerations and obstacles. It is imperative that these be recognized in the planning...

Person: Brown, Mutch, Weatherspoon, Wakimoto, Hurd
Year: 1995
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the Conclusions ... 'Thus, innovative partnerships, cooperative land management among agnecies, and application of ecological principles to management, all steeped in the churning cauldron of politics, and leavened with public education, are...

Person: Brown, Mutch, Weatherspoon, Wakimoto, Jarvis
Year: 1995
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

The challenge for resource managers is to understand and appreciate the wilderness resource. We must embrace a philosophy that allows natural fire to play its natural role, within social and political realities. As we alter the natural processes, we...

Person: Brown, Mutch, Weatherspoon, Wakimoto, Jolly
Year: 1995
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Prescribed natural fire programs in the National Park Service have changed dramatically following the 1988 Yellowstone fires. The area burned per year has declined by 94 percent even though the area within prescribed natural fire zones has increased....

Person: Brown, Mutch, Weatherspoon, Wakimoto, Botti, Nichols
Year: 1995
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

The decision process involved in developing any plan to manage a prescribed natural fire must consider several divergent resource and management goals. In many cases, these fires may be projected to be, and eventually become, large and long-duration...

Person: Brown, Mutch, Weatherspoon, Wakimoto, Bunnell
Year: 1995
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the text ... 'In recognizing that fire is critical to sustained ecosystem function, it is also important to achnowledge that fire cannot itself be the goal or endpoint of management. Rather, we must identify and set objectives for the key...

Person: Christensen
Year: 1995
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the text ... 'Agency planning processes are critical to determining when and where fire is used as a management tool, not only management-ignited fire, but prescribed natural fire as well. Fire use must be linked to program management...

Person: Brown, Mutch, Weatherspoon, Wakimoto, Coats
Year: 1995
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

The Limits of Acceptable Change (LAC) planning process was developed to help define objectives for recreation management in wilderness. This process can be applied to fire in wilderness if its conceptual foundation is broadened. LAC would lead decision...

Person: Brown, Mutch, Weatherspoon, Wakimoto, Cole
Year: 1995
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the text ... 'Thus, the intent of this paper is to suggest that prescribed fire can be used in a manner that, on balance with wildfire, provides a net reduction in air emissions and a net improvement and benefit to air quality and public...

Person: Brown, Mutch, Weatherspoon, Wakimoto, Coloff
Year: 1995
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

[no description entered]

Person: Telfer
Year: 1995
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS