Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Displaying 1 - 10 of 38

More and more people are making their homes in woodland settings in or near forests, rural areas, or remote mountain sites - areas in which wildfires are more likely to occur. Wildfires often begin unnoticed. They spread quickly, igniting brush, trees...

Person:
Year: 2007
Resource Group: Media
Source: FRAMES

From the text ... 'This special issue compilation of eight papers demonstrates the breadth of remote sensing applications on the cutting edge of fire ecology research. Remotely sensed imagery can provide objective measures of fire perimeters, burn...

Person: Hudak, Thode, van Wagtendonk
Year: 2007
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

For at least two decades, expansion of low-density residential development at the wildland-urban interface has been widely recognized as a primary factor influencing the management of US national forests. We estimate the location, extent, and trends in...

Person: Theobald, Romme
Year: 2007
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

This paper is based on a survey of homeowners living adjacent to the extensive and heavily vegetated North Saskatchewan River Valley and Ravine System in Edmonton, Alberta. Residents in a random sample of 436 households adjacent to this urban natural...

Person: McGee
Year: 2007
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Old growth in the frequent-fire conifer forests of the western United States, such as those containing ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa), Jeffrey pine (P. jeffreyi), giant sequoia (Sequioa giganteum) and other species, has undergone major changes since...

Person: Abella, Covington, Fulé, Lentile, Sánchez Meador , Morgan
Year: 2007
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

In their classic article Allen and Gould (Allen, G.M., and E.M. Gould. 1986. Complexity, wickedness, and public forests. J. For. 84(4):20 -24) stated that the most daunting problems associated with public forest management had a ''wicked...

Person: Carroll, Blatner, Cohn, Morgan
Year: 2007
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the text ... 'Preventing structure loss has become a major focal point of wildland firefighting. Most days, it feels like wildland fire professionals and land managers are becoming more and more responsible for reducing property losses in the...

Person: Fege, Absher
Year: 2007
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

To improve access, interpretability, and use of the full body of research, a pilot project was initiated by the USDA Forest Service to synthesize relevant scientific information and develop publications and decision support tools that managers can use...

Person: Jakes
Year: 2007
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the text ... 'These three trends -- WUI, Weather, and Wood -- along with our desire to light more fire, to allow more fire use events, and to suppress fires -- intersect in our profession.'

Person: Harbour
Year: 2007
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the text ... 'Of today's three main chemical suppression/application product groups -- long-term retardants, foam fire suppressants, and water enhancers -- the water enhancer group has recently received the greatest interest from fire...

Person: Holsinger, Henderson
Year: 2007
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS