Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Displaying 1 - 10 of 13

Decision making for managers in a fire situation can be very complicated. The information brought to the decision maker must be well though out and accurate. Before meaningful strategy can be formulated, realistic agreed-upon objectives for the...

Person: Brown, Mutch, Weatherspoon, Wakimoto, Poncin
Year: 1995
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

The decision process involved in developing any plan to manage a prescribed natural fire must consider several divergent resource and management goals. In many cases, these fires may be projected to be, and eventually become, large and long-duration...

Person: Brown, Mutch, Weatherspoon, Wakimoto, Bunnell
Year: 1995
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

[no description entered]

Person: McAlpine
Year: 1995
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Although an increasing frequency of forest fires has been suggested as a consequence of global warming, there are no empirical data that have shown climatically driven increases in fire frequency since the warming that has followed the end of the...

Person: Bergeron, Flannigan
Year: 1995
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Ring-width chronologies from three white spruce (Picea glauca (Moench) Voss) and two jack pine (Pinus banksiana Lamb.) sites in the boreal forest of northern Alberta were constructed to determine whether they could provide proxy records of monthly...

Person: Larsen, Macdonald
Year: 1995
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

FIRE! is one example of GIS models that go beyond inventory, monitoring, and display to allow ecosystem managers to simulate the spatial outcomes of management and policy decisions. By making the ability to vary critical model assumptions readily...

Person: Green, Finney, Campbell, Weinstein, Landrum
Year: 1995
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

A graph has been constructed for determining one of five possible head fire intensity classes as well as the general type of fire (i.e., surface,intermittent crown or continuous crown) for Canadian Forest Fire Behavior Prediction System Fuel Type C-2 F...

Person: Alexander, Cole
Year: 1995
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Surface fire intensity (kilowatts per metre) and crown fire initiation were predicted using Rothermel's 1972 and Van Wagner@s 1977 fire models with fuel data from 47 upland subalpine conifer stands varying in age from 22-258 yr and 35 yr of...

Person: Bessie, Johnson
Year: 1995
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

In July 1992, after several seasons of informal testing, Alaska's interagency fire management community decided to adopt the Canadian Forest Fire Danger Rating System in lieu of continuing to use the US National Fire Danger Rating System. The...

Person: Cole, Alexander
Year: 1995
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

This work considers the modelling of two dimensional fire spread for heterogeneous fuel and meteorological conditions. Differential equations are used as the modelling form, and a set of partial differential equations that describes fire growth in...

Person: Richards
Year: 1995
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS