Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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From the text ... 'The 1988 fire season showed us much about the importance of basing decisions on fire regimes and their associated fire behavior characteristics. Although our policies are necessarily broad, we are learnng that implementation of...

Person: Brown, Mutch, Weatherspoon, Wakimoto, Williams
Year: 1995
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Decision making for managers in a fire situation can be very complicated. The information brought to the decision maker must be well though out and accurate. Before meaningful strategy can be formulated, realistic agreed-upon objectives for the...

Person: Brown, Mutch, Weatherspoon, Wakimoto, Poncin
Year: 1995
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

What we call wilderness fire is the merger, collision, mixture, alliance, confrontation, and altogether curious and perplexing association of two very different traditions. One is nature preservation, particularly as expressed in wilderness; the other...

Person: Brown, Mutch, Weatherspoon, Wakimoto, Pyne
Year: 1995
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

To trully allow fires to play their natural role in wilderness ecosystems, it is sometimes necessary to have large fires of long duration. Large fires are ecologically significant events that drive many other ecosystem processes. However, these fires...

Person: Brown, Mutch, Weatherspoon, Wakimoto, van Wagtendonk
Year: 1995
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the text ... 'In this paper we will review those changes [the National Park Service made after the Yellowstone fires of 1988 in the way fire policies had previously been implemented] to determine what impacts they have had during the past...

Person: Brown, Mutch, Weatherspoon, Wakimoto, Kilgore, Nichols
Year: 1995
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Since 1972, prescribed natural fire plans have been developed and implemented for several of the larger wildernesses in the country like the Frank Church-River of No Return, Teton, Selway-Bitterroot, Bob Marshall, Scapegoat, Absaroka-Beartooth, Gila,...

Person: Brown, Mutch, Weatherspoon, Wakimoto, Mutch
Year: 1995
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the text ... 'A major problem that land management agencies must overcome is that air quality agency staff usually do not have an understanding for the needs and uses of prescribed fire. While air quality agency staff have excellent...

Person: Brown, Mutch, Weatherspoon, Wakimoto, Haddow
Year: 1995
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the text ... 'In recognizing that fire is critical to sustained ecosystem function, it is also important to achnowledge that fire cannot itself be the goal or endpoint of management. Rather, we must identify and set objectives for the key...

Person: Christensen
Year: 1995
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

There are areas in the boreal forest where the combination of highly flammable vagetation and frequent ignition events create a high fire hazard. The resultant fires cause considerable economic and social damage. During global change, fire frequency...

Person: Hogenbirk, Sarrazin-Delay
Year: 1995
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

[no description entered]

Person: McAlpine
Year: 1995
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS