Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Displaying 1 - 10 of 135

Greenhouse gas emissions have significantly altered global climate, and will continue to do so in the future. Increases in the frequency, duration, and/or severity of drought and heat stress associated with climate change could fundamentally alter the...

Person: Allen, Macalady, Chenchouni, Bachelet, McDowell, Vennetier, Kitzberger, Rigling, Breshears, Hogg, Gonzalez, Fensham, Zhang, Castro, Demidova, Lim, Allard, Running, Semerci, Cobb
Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Preliminary list of fire research needs in Alaska.

Person: Barnes
Year: 2010
Resource Group: Media
Source: FRAMES

The Natural Areas Association Fire compendium compiles articles from the Natural Areas Journal from 1983 to 2009 that address some aspect of fire ecology or fire management. Some papers specifically focus on the effects of fire on a particular...

Person:
Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

America does not have a fire problem. It has many fire problems. The policy of fire exclusion through most of the 20th century seemed successful at first but eventually lead to larger, more intense, and damaging fires. By the mid-1970s federal agencies...

Person: Pyne
Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

From the text ... 'As we move forward and as we put more prescribed fire across the nation, there are going to be things like smoke incidents, there will be accidents, there will be loss of structures. And, yes, there will even be loss of life....

Person: Robertson, Galley, Masters, Long
Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

The report synthesizes the literature and current state of knowledge pertaining to reintroducing fire in stands where it has been excluded for long periods and the impact of these introductory fires on overstory tree injury and mortality. Only forested...

Person: Hood
Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

With the emergence of a new forest management paradigm based on the emulation of natural disturbance regimes, interest in fire-related studies has increased in the boreal forest management community. A key issue in this regard is the improvement of our...

Person: Girardin, Ali, Hély
Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

This report was designed to meet three broad goals: (1) evaluate wildfire hazard on Federal lands; (2) develop information useful in prioritizing where fuels treatments and mitigation measures might be proposed to address significant fire hazard and...

Person: Calkin, Ager, Gilbertson-Day, Calkin, Ager, Gilbertson-Day, Scott, Finney, Schrader-Patton, Quigley, Strittholt, Kaiden
Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Recent studies in the Western United States have supported climate scenarios that predict a higher occurrence of large and severe wildfires. Knowledge of the severity is important to infer long-term biogeochemical, ecological, and societal impacts, but...

Person: Smith, Eitel, Hudak
Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

Wildfire and logging are common disturbances in the forests of northwestern North America, causing changes in soil chemistry and microbiology, including fungal and nitrogen-cycling bacterial communities. These organisms play key roles in nutrient...

Person: Kennedy, Egger
Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS