Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Displaying 1 - 10 of 180

We use a value of information (VOI) approach to demonstrate the cost effectiveness of using satellite imagery as part of Burn Area Emergency Response (BAER), a federal program that identifies imminent post-wildfire threats to human life and safety,...

Person: Bernknopf, Kuwayama, Gibson, Blakely, Mabee, Clifford, Quayle, Epting, Hardy, Goodrich
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

FireCLIME (Fire-Climate Landscape Interactions in Montane Ecosystems) Vulnerability Assessment v3.1 is a macro-enabled Excel file (xlsm). A user guide is also available below.

Person: Friggens
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Tool
Source: FRAMES

Alaska's Fire Environment: Not an Average Place is a compilation of excerpts from the keynote presentation given by Robert "Zeke" Ziel at the Albuquerque location of the 2019 Fire Behavior and Fuels Conference. 

Alaska is nearly 18% of USA...

Person: Ziel
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

This report assesses how carbon stocks at regional scales and in individual national forests are affected by factors such as timber harvesting, natural disturbances, climate variability, increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations, and...

Person: Birdsey, Dugan, Healey, Dante-Wood, Zhang, Ho, Chen, Hernandez, Raymond, McCarter
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Novel fire regimes are expected in many boreal regions, and it is unclear how biogeochemical cycles will respond. We leverage fire and vegetation records from a highly flammable ecoregion in Alaska and present new lake-sediment analyses to examine...

Person: Chipman, Hu
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Wildland fire captures the public’s attention every summer, but public understanding of fire is limited. This lack of understanding may contribute to poor support of fire management activities, particularly those that use fire for resource benefit. The...

Person: Abrahamson
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Media
Source: FRAMES

Predictive models of tree mortality and survival are vital for management planning and understanding fire effects in forest communities and landscapes. Post-fire tree mortality has been traditionally modeled as an empirical function of tree defenses (e...

Person: Cansler
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Media
Source: FRAMES

The U.S. Geological Survey's Wildland Fire Science Program produces fundamental information to identify the causes of wildfires, understand the impacts and benefits of both wildfires and prescribed fires, and help prevent and manage larger,...

Person: Steblein, Miller, Soileau
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Purpose of Review: This review is on global wildland fire management research needs from the standpoint of 'integrated fire management'. It seeks to apply a characterisation of fires to frame research needs, and also recognise some differences in...

Person: Moore
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Investigations of compound disturbances that alter forest resilience (i.e., recovery time or trajectory) have escalated over the past two decades. We used a systematic approach to identify and describe the ecological consequences of discrete forest...

Person: Kleinman, Goode, Fries, Hart
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES