Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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The challenge for resource managers is to understand and appreciate the wilderness resource. We must embrace a philosophy that allows natural fire to play its natural role, within social and political realities. As we alter the natural processes, we...

Person: Brown, Mutch, Weatherspoon, Wakimoto, Jolly
Year: 1995
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

[no description entered]

Person: Telfer
Year: 1995
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

This paper looks first at the kind of forest fire statistics that are currently available in Canada. The main statistics are number of fires area burned, causes, and control costs. Good inventory data on burned areas are not available. The recent...

Person: Brand, Van Wagner
Year: 1991
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

We report here the results of laboratory and computer simulations designed to supply information on soil temperatures under forest and range fires. Measurements of temperature and water content in a soil column that was heated strongly at the surface...

Person: Campbell, Jungbauer, Bristow, Hungerford
Year: 1995
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Breeding populations of the fire-adapted carabid-beetle A. quadripunctatum were found in most of the fifteen investigated burned, uncut forests, but not in any of the fifteen burned clear-cuts, although a few immigrants were found in two of them. The...

Person: Wikars
Year: 1995
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

[no description entered]

Person: Keiter, Boyce
Year: 1991
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Surface fire intensity (kilowatts per metre) and crown fire initiation were predicted using Rothermel's 1972 and Van Wagner's 1977 fire models with fuel data from 47 upland subalpine conifer stands (comprising Pinus contorta var. latifolia,...

Person: Bessie, Johnson
Year: 1995
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

Above-and below-ground vegetation recovery was assessed 2,4 and 8 years after logging and burning on an age sequence of sites dominated by salal (Gaultheria shallon Pursh) on northern Vancouver Island, British Columbia. The total above-ground...

Person: Messier, Kimmins
Year: 1991
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

The acceleration phase of a forest fire, from ignition to the equilibrium rate of spread, is perhaps the most important phase of fire behavior because often it represents the only time period in which suppression efforts could be effective. A series of...

Person: McAlpine, Wakimoto
Year: 1991
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

My purpose in this paper is to outline a research and management manifesto for the northern bobwhite in the 1990's. My objectives are to (1) describe the probable causes for the northern bobwhite population decline, (2) outline the research agenda...

Person: Brennan
Year: 1991
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS