Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

Displaying 1 - 9 of 9

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Person: Cerulean, Engstrom, James, Leenhouts, Moore, Tanner, Vanderlinden
Year: 1995
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the Introduction ... 'The purpose of this summary is to describe the four emergent themes of the Fire and Wetlands Conference. The first theme is that wetlands are interestint model systems for studying fire effects. However, wetland systems...

Person: Cerulean, Engstrom, Brennan
Year: 1995
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

An integrated study to define fire relationships in wetland soils is described The objectives are to define the limits to combustion (ignition and burnout), model heat and vapor transport, and predict fire effects in organic soils. The goal is to...

Person: Cerulean, Engstrom, Hungerford, Frandsen, Ryan
Year: 1995
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Economic and ecological losses can be high when a wild or prescribed fire rages out of control into natural areas such as wetlands, national parks and conservation areas. These natural areas are often crossed by a network of road, railway and power...

Person: Cerulean, Engstrom, Sarrazin, Hogenbirk
Year: 1995
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

A conceptual ecosystem model illustrates principles of ecosystem management in wetlands. Wetlands are excellent systems for the development of ecosystem management principles because they are relatively simple ecosystems and respond quickly to changes...

Person: Cerulean, Engstrom, Lugo
Year: 1995
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Surface fires in wetland ecosystems frequently ignite smoldering ground fires. Ground fires often create and maintain open, shallow marshes that contribute to ecosystem diversity. Fire exclusion, drainage, deforestation, and other human activities have...

Person: Cerulean, Engstrom, Hungerford, Frandsen, Ryan
Year: 1995
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

The Red Bench Fire of 1988 was the most significant fire to occur within the North Fork of the Flathead River drainage since 1926. Several wet sedge meadows were burned within Glacier National Park. To determine the effects of fire on vegetation...

Person: Cerulean, Engstrom, Willard, Wakimoto, Ryan
Year: 1995
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Surface fires in wetland ecosystems frequently ignite smoldering ground fires. Ground fires often create and maintain open, shallow marshes that contribute to ecosystem diversity. Fire exclusion, drainage, deforestation, and other human activities have...

Person: Cerulean, Engstrom, Hungerford, Frandsen, Ryan
Year: 1995
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Experiments conducted in wet-meadows in northeastern Alberta, Canada, tested hypotheses about species response to environmental changes expected during global warming. We hypothesized that (i) a lower water table would decrease abundance of the...

Person: Cerulean, Engstrom, Hogenbirk, Wein
Year: 1995
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS