Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Displaying 81 - 90 of 148

Boreal forest fires are an important source of terrestrial carbon emissions, particularly during years of widespread wildfires. Most carbon emission models parameterize wildfire impacts and carbon flux to area burned by fires, therein making the...

Person: Kolden, Abatzoglou
Year: 2012
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Wildfire is the primary ecological driver of succession in the boreal forest and may become increasingly important within tundra ecosystems as the Arctic warms. Migratory barren-ground caribou (Rangifer tarandus granti) rely heavily on terricolous...

Person: Joly, Duffy, Rupp
Year: 2012
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Field experiments are one way to develop or validate wildland fire-behavior models. It is important to consider the implications of assumptions relating to the locality of measurements with respect to the fire, the temporal frequency of the measured...

Person: Linn, Anderson, Winterkamp, Brooks, Wotton, Dupuy, Pimont, Edminster
Year: 2012
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Policymakers and decision makers alike have suggested that the use of less aggressive suppression strategies for wildland fires might help stem the tide of rising emergency wildland fire expenditures. However, the interplay of wildland fire management...

Person: Gebert, Black
Year: 2012
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

Across the globe, wildfire-related destruction appears to be worsening despite increased fire suppression expenditure. At the same time, wildfire management is becoming increasingly complicated owing to factors such as an expanding wildland-urban...

Person: Minas, Hearne, Handmer
Year: 2012
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

FSPro (Fire Spread Probability) is a fire modeling system that calculates the probability of fire spread from a fire perimeter or ignition point for a specified time period. Combining landscape data layers (crown base height, crown bulk density, etc...

Person:
Year: 2012
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Instructions for overlaying a fuel model image in Google Earth, derived from a PNW fire behavior workshop in Vancouver, WA.

Person: Stratton
Year: 2012
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Human land use practices, altered climates, and shifting forest and fire management policies have increased the frequency of large wildfires several-fold. Mitigation of potential fire behaviour and fire severity have increasingly been attempted through...

Person: Cochrane, Moran, Wimberly, Baer, Finney, Beckendorf, Eidenshink, Zhu
Year: 2012
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

Millions of trees killed by bark beetles in western North America have raised concerns about subsequent wildfire, but studies have reported a range of conclusions, often seemingly contradictory, about effects on fuels and wildfire. In this study, we...

Person: Hicke, Johnson, Hayes, Preisler
Year: 2012
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

Land managers have been using fire behavior and simulation models to assist in several fire management tasks. These widely-used models use average attributes to make stand-level predictions without considering spatial variability of fuels within a...

Person: Contreras, Parsons, Chung
Year: 2012
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES