Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Displaying 1 - 10 of 13

From Wildland Fire Management Recommendations ... 'The protection of cultural resources during wildland fire is more challenging than for a prescribed burn. Treatment options available to mitigate the direct impacts from wildland fire include use...

Person: Ryan, Jones, Koerner, Lee, Timmons, deBano, Ryan
Year: 2012
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the text ... 'Wildland fire managers face increasingly steep challenges to meet air quality standards while planning prescribed fire and its inevitable smoke emissions. The goals of sound fire management practices, including fuel load...

Person: LeQuire, Hunter
Year: 2012
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Heating any soil during a sufficiently intense wildfire or prescribed burn can alter it irreversibly, causing many significant, long-term biological, chemical, and hydrological effects. Given the climate-change-driven increasing probability of...

Person: Massman
Year: 2012
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Fire managers base a growing number of decisions on information from a variety of computer systems.

Person: Calvin
Year: 1995
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Surface fires in wetland ecosystems frequently ignite smoldering ground fires. Ground fires often create and maintain open, shallow marshes that contribute to ecosystem diversity. Fire exclusion, drainage, deforestation, and other human activities have...

Person: Cerulean, Engstrom, Hungerford, Frandsen, Ryan
Year: 1995
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

The economics of wildfire is complicated because wildfire behavior depends on the spatial and temporal scale at which management decisions made, and because of uncertainties surrounding the results of management actions. Like the wildfire processes...

Person: Lafayette, Brooks, Potyondy, Audin, Krieger, Trettin, Mercer, Prestemon
Year: 2012
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Prescribed burning for fuel reduction is a major strategy for reducing the risk from unplanned fire. Although there are theoretical studies suggesting that prescribed fire has a strong negative influence on the subsequent area of unplanned fire (so-...

Person: Price
Year: 2012
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Evaluating the risks of wildfire relative to the valuable resources found in any managed landscape requires an interdisciplinary approach. Researchers at the Rocky Mountain Research Station and Western Wildland Threat Assessment Center developed such a...

Person: Malcolm
Year: 2012
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

The purpose of the workshop was for research scientists, air quality specialists, policy administrators, and others to present and discuss recent advances in research relating to estimation of emission factors for particulate matter (PM) and its...

Person: Robertson
Year: 2012
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Human land use practices, altered climates, and shifting forest and fire management policies have increased the frequency of large wildfires several-fold. Mitigation of potential fire behaviour and fire severity have increasingly been attempted through...

Person: Cochrane, Moran, Wimberly, Baer, Finney, Beckendorf, Eidenshink, Zhu
Year: 2012
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS