Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Displaying 1 - 7 of 7

Fire emissions and smoke impacts from wildland fire are a growing concern due to increasing fire season severity, dwindling tolerance of smoke by the public, tightening air quality regulations, and their role in climate change issues. Unfortunately, as...

Person: Larkin, Raffuse, Strand, Wheeler, Potter
Year: 2012
Resource Group: Project
Source: FRAMES

We propose development of a new methodology that can be used by forest and fire managers and planners to consider the potential effects of all aspects of fire management (i.e., fuels reduction to post-fire restoration) on native stream fishes and their...

Person: Reeves, Burris, Verhunc
Year: 2012
Resource Group: Project
Source: FRAMES

With this research we seek to answer the question: What are the social characteristics and conditions of human communities that promote adaptive capacity for wildfire? In human communities, vulnerability to disasters is influenced not only by exposure...

Person: Jakes, Carroll, Garrison
Year: 2012
Resource Group: Project
Source: FRAMES

Climate projections for the next 20-50 years forecast higher temperatures and variable precipitation for many landscapes in the western United States and many ecosystem and fire modelers are using gridded future climate data generated and synthesized...

Person: Keane, Loehman
Year: 2012
Resource Group: Project
Source: FRAMES

Landscape Fire Succession Models (LFSMs) are not able to account for influences that large grazing herbivores have on succession and fuel dynamics. Grazing is nevertheless a highly variable disturbance agent that does influence the development of wild...

Person: Vavra, Cook, Wisdom, Burris, Verhunc
Year: 2012
Resource Group: Project
Source: FRAMES

This project will test the hypothesis that public fire suppression in forested areas increases the fraction of developed land in these areas, drawing people and structures into the wildland/urban interface. To test this hypothesis, we will construct...

Person: Olmstead, Kousky, Sedjo, Gebert, Major
Year: 2012
Resource Group: Project
Source: FRAMES

Currently there are no fire spread models evaluated for use in wildland-urban interface (WUI) fires. A number of possible model approaches can be applied to WUI fires. They can range from the relatively simple rule or empirically based to the very...

Person: Mell, Forney, Rehm, Rinehart
Year: 2012
Resource Group: Project
Source: FRAMES